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Title: Convective Transition Statistics over Tropical Oceans for Climate Model Diagnostics: Observational Baseline

Abstract

Not provided.Convective transition statistics, which describe the relation between column-integrated water vapor (CWV) and precipitation, are compiled over tropical oceans using satellite and ARM site measurements to quantify the temperature and resolution dependence of the precipitation–CWV relation at fast time scales relevant to convection. At these time scales, and for precipitation especially, uncertainties associated with observational systems must be addressed by examining features with a variety of instrumentation and identifying robust behaviors versus instrument sensitivity at high rain rates. Here the sharp pickup in precipitation as CWV exceeds a certain critical threshold is found to be insensitive to spatial resolution, with convective onset occurring at higher CWV but at lower column relative humidity as bulk tropospheric temperature increases. Mean tropospheric temperature profiles conditioned on precipitation show vertically coherent structure across a wide range of temperature, reaffirming the use of a bulk temperature measure in defining the convective transition statistics. The joint probability distribution of CWV and precipitation develops a peak probability at low precipitation for CWV above critical, with rapidly decreasing probability of high precipitation below and near critical, and exhibits systematic changes under spatial averaging. The precipitation pickup with CWV is reasonably insensitive to time averaging up to severalmore » hours but is smoothed at daily time scales. This work demonstrates that CWV relative to critical serves as an effective predictor of precipitation with only minor geographic variations in the tropics, quantifies precipitation-related statistics subject to different spatial–temporal resolution, and provides a baseline for model comparison to apply these statistics as observational constraints on precipitation processes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1435682
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1541829
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0011074; AGS-1540518
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences Journal Volume: 75 Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-4928
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences

Citation Formats

Kuo, Yi-Hung, Schiro, Kathleen A., and Neelin, J. David. Convective Transition Statistics over Tropical Oceans for Climate Model Diagnostics: Observational Baseline. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-17-0287.1.
Kuo, Yi-Hung, Schiro, Kathleen A., & Neelin, J. David. Convective Transition Statistics over Tropical Oceans for Climate Model Diagnostics: Observational Baseline. United States. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-17-0287.1.
Kuo, Yi-Hung, Schiro, Kathleen A., and Neelin, J. David. Tue . "Convective Transition Statistics over Tropical Oceans for Climate Model Diagnostics: Observational Baseline". United States. doi:10.1175/JAS-D-17-0287.1.
@article{osti_1435682,
title = {Convective Transition Statistics over Tropical Oceans for Climate Model Diagnostics: Observational Baseline},
author = {Kuo, Yi-Hung and Schiro, Kathleen A. and Neelin, J. David},
abstractNote = {Not provided.Convective transition statistics, which describe the relation between column-integrated water vapor (CWV) and precipitation, are compiled over tropical oceans using satellite and ARM site measurements to quantify the temperature and resolution dependence of the precipitation–CWV relation at fast time scales relevant to convection. At these time scales, and for precipitation especially, uncertainties associated with observational systems must be addressed by examining features with a variety of instrumentation and identifying robust behaviors versus instrument sensitivity at high rain rates. Here the sharp pickup in precipitation as CWV exceeds a certain critical threshold is found to be insensitive to spatial resolution, with convective onset occurring at higher CWV but at lower column relative humidity as bulk tropospheric temperature increases. Mean tropospheric temperature profiles conditioned on precipitation show vertically coherent structure across a wide range of temperature, reaffirming the use of a bulk temperature measure in defining the convective transition statistics. The joint probability distribution of CWV and precipitation develops a peak probability at low precipitation for CWV above critical, with rapidly decreasing probability of high precipitation below and near critical, and exhibits systematic changes under spatial averaging. The precipitation pickup with CWV is reasonably insensitive to time averaging up to several hours but is smoothed at daily time scales. This work demonstrates that CWV relative to critical serves as an effective predictor of precipitation with only minor geographic variations in the tropics, quantifies precipitation-related statistics subject to different spatial–temporal resolution, and provides a baseline for model comparison to apply these statistics as observational constraints on precipitation processes.},
doi = {10.1175/JAS-D-17-0287.1},
journal = {Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences},
number = 5,
volume = 75,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1175/JAS-D-17-0287.1

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2 works
Citation information provided by
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