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Title: Endogeic earthworm densities increase in response to higher fine-root production in a forest exposed to elevated CO 2

Net primary productivity (NPP) influences soil food webs and ultimately the amount of carbon (C) inputs in ecosystems. Earthworms can physically protect organic matter from rapid mineralization through the formation of soil aggregates. Previous studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free Air CO 2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment showed that elevated [CO 2] (e[CO 2]) increased fine-root production and increased soil C through soil aggregation compared to ambient [CO 2] (a[CO 2]) conditions. Our first objective was to study the response of earthworms to increased leaf and root-litter inputs caused by increased atmospheric [CO 2] exposure. Here, we also took advantage of the CO 2 shutdown at the ORNL FACE site to track the shift of the δ 13C signal in leaf-litter, fine roots, earthworms, earthworm casts, and bulk soil. Densities of the most abundant endogeic earthworm, Diplocardia spp., were positively correlated with the previous-year production of leaf litter (r=0.66, P=0.02) and fine roots (r=0.62, P=0.03); and with the leaf-litter production (r=0.63, P=0.03) and fine-root production (r=0.59, P=0.05) two years before earthworms were sampled. Within two years after the CO 2 fumigation ceased, the 13C/ 12C ratio increased in leaf litter (P=0.01) and in fine roots (P=0.05), showing anmore » ecosystem legacy effect on soil C inputs. However, the C isotopic composition of soil, endogeic earthworms and casts had not changed the two years after the CO 2 fumigation ended. The positive response of earthworms to increased root NPP, caused by elevated [CO 2], is consistent with the increased soil aggregate formation and increased soil C at the ORNL FACE in the e[CO 2] treatment.« less
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR (United States). Dept. of Agro-environmental Sciences
  2. Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Inst. for Environmental Science and Policy
  3. Univ. of Puerto Rico, Utuado, PR (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division and Climate Change Science Inst.
  5. Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Biology
  6. Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; DEB-0919276
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0038-0717
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Endogeic; Earthworm; Diplocardia; Free-air CO2 enrichment
OSTI Identifier:
1435254

Sanchez-de Leon, Yaniria, Wise, David H., Lugo-Perez, Javier, Norby, Richard J., James, Samuel W., and Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.. Endogeic earthworm densities increase in response to higher fine-root production in a forest exposed to elevated CO2. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.03.027.
Sanchez-de Leon, Yaniria, Wise, David H., Lugo-Perez, Javier, Norby, Richard J., James, Samuel W., & Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.. Endogeic earthworm densities increase in response to higher fine-root production in a forest exposed to elevated CO2. United States. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.03.027.
Sanchez-de Leon, Yaniria, Wise, David H., Lugo-Perez, Javier, Norby, Richard J., James, Samuel W., and Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.. 2018. "Endogeic earthworm densities increase in response to higher fine-root production in a forest exposed to elevated CO2". United States. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.03.027. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1435254.
@article{osti_1435254,
title = {Endogeic earthworm densities increase in response to higher fine-root production in a forest exposed to elevated CO2},
author = {Sanchez-de Leon, Yaniria and Wise, David H. and Lugo-Perez, Javier and Norby, Richard J. and James, Samuel W. and Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.},
abstractNote = {Net primary productivity (NPP) influences soil food webs and ultimately the amount of carbon (C) inputs in ecosystems. Earthworms can physically protect organic matter from rapid mineralization through the formation of soil aggregates. Previous studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiment showed that elevated [CO2] (e[CO2]) increased fine-root production and increased soil C through soil aggregation compared to ambient [CO2] (a[CO2]) conditions. Our first objective was to study the response of earthworms to increased leaf and root-litter inputs caused by increased atmospheric [CO2] exposure. Here, we also took advantage of the CO2 shutdown at the ORNL FACE site to track the shift of the δ13C signal in leaf-litter, fine roots, earthworms, earthworm casts, and bulk soil. Densities of the most abundant endogeic earthworm, Diplocardia spp., were positively correlated with the previous-year production of leaf litter (r=0.66, P=0.02) and fine roots (r=0.62, P=0.03); and with the leaf-litter production (r=0.63, P=0.03) and fine-root production (r=0.59, P=0.05) two years before earthworms were sampled. Within two years after the CO2 fumigation ceased, the 13C/12C ratio increased in leaf litter (P=0.01) and in fine roots (P=0.05), showing an ecosystem legacy effect on soil C inputs. However, the C isotopic composition of soil, endogeic earthworms and casts had not changed the two years after the CO2 fumigation ended. The positive response of earthworms to increased root NPP, caused by elevated [CO2], is consistent with the increased soil aggregate formation and increased soil C at the ORNL FACE in the e[CO2] treatment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.soilbio.2018.03.027},
journal = {Soil Biology and Biochemistry},
number = C,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}