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Title: The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on Enrichments of Hydrocarbon Degrading Microbes From the Gulf of Mexico Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was one of the largest and deepest oil spills recorded. The wellhead was located at approximately 1500 m below the sea where low temperature and high pressure are key environmental characteristics. Using cells collected 4 months following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill at the Gulf of Mexico, we set up Macondo crude oil enrichments at wellhead temperature and different pressures to determine the effect of increasing depth/pressure to the in situ microbial community and their ability to degrade oil. We observed oil degradation under all pressure conditions tested [0.1, 15, and 30 megapascals (MPa)], although oil degradation profiles, cell numbers, and hydrocarbon degradation gene abundances indicated greatest activity at atmospheric pressure. Under all incubations the growth of psychrophilic bacteria was promoted. Bacteria closely related to Oleispira antarctica RB-8 dominated the communities at all pressures. At 30 MPa we observed a shift toward Photobacterium, a genus that includes piezophiles. Alphaproteobacterial members of the Sulfitobacter, previously associated with oil-degradation, were also highly abundant at 0.1 MPa. Our results suggest that pressure acts synergistically with low temperature to slow microbial growth and thus oil degradation in deep-sea environments.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [2]
  1. Aarhus Univ. (Denmark); Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
  2. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
  3. Aarhus Univ. (Denmark)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231; 231612-00; Project 1265
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 0; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1434792
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1474531; OSTI ID: 1479399

Marietou, Angeliki, Chastain, Roger, Beulig, Felix, Scoma, Alberto, Hazen, Terry C., and Bartlett, Douglas H.. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on Enrichments of Hydrocarbon Degrading Microbes From the Gulf of Mexico Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00808.
Marietou, Angeliki, Chastain, Roger, Beulig, Felix, Scoma, Alberto, Hazen, Terry C., & Bartlett, Douglas H.. The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on Enrichments of Hydrocarbon Degrading Microbes From the Gulf of Mexico Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00808.
Marietou, Angeliki, Chastain, Roger, Beulig, Felix, Scoma, Alberto, Hazen, Terry C., and Bartlett, Douglas H.. 2018. "The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on Enrichments of Hydrocarbon Degrading Microbes From the Gulf of Mexico Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00808.
@article{osti_1434792,
title = {The Effect of Hydrostatic Pressure on Enrichments of Hydrocarbon Degrading Microbes From the Gulf of Mexico Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill},
author = {Marietou, Angeliki and Chastain, Roger and Beulig, Felix and Scoma, Alberto and Hazen, Terry C. and Bartlett, Douglas H.},
abstractNote = {The Deepwater Horizon oil spill was one of the largest and deepest oil spills recorded. The wellhead was located at approximately 1500 m below the sea where low temperature and high pressure are key environmental characteristics. Using cells collected 4 months following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill at the Gulf of Mexico, we set up Macondo crude oil enrichments at wellhead temperature and different pressures to determine the effect of increasing depth/pressure to the in situ microbial community and their ability to degrade oil. We observed oil degradation under all pressure conditions tested [0.1, 15, and 30 megapascals (MPa)], although oil degradation profiles, cell numbers, and hydrocarbon degradation gene abundances indicated greatest activity at atmospheric pressure. Under all incubations the growth of psychrophilic bacteria was promoted. Bacteria closely related to Oleispira antarctica RB-8 dominated the communities at all pressures. At 30 MPa we observed a shift toward Photobacterium, a genus that includes piezophiles. Alphaproteobacterial members of the Sulfitobacter, previously associated with oil-degradation, were also highly abundant at 0.1 MPa. Our results suggest that pressure acts synergistically with low temperature to slow microbial growth and thus oil degradation in deep-sea environments.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2018.00808},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = 0,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

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