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Title: Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils

Abstract

Climate change-induced perturbations in the hydrologic regime are expected to impact biogeochemical processes, including contaminant mobility and cycling. Elevated levels of geogenic and anthropogenic arsenic are found along many coasts around the world, most notably in south and southeast Asia but also in the United States, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic coast. The mechanism by and the extent to which arsenic may be released in contaminated coastal soils due to sea level rise are unknown. Here we show a series of data from a coastal arsenic-contaminated soil exposed to sea and river waters in biogeochemical microcosm reactors across field-validated redox conditions. We find that reducing conditions lead to arsenic release from historically contaminated coastal soils through reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing mineral oxides in both sea and river water inundations, with less arsenic release from seawater scenarios than river water due to inhibition of oxide dissolution. For the first time, we systematically display gradation of solid phase soil-arsenic speciation across defined redox windows from reducing to oxidizing conditions in natural waters by combining biogeochemical microcosm experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, our results demonstrate the threat of sea level rise stands to impact arsenic release from contaminated coastal soils by changing redoxmore » conditions.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States)
  2. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  4. Univ. of Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1434765
Report Number(s):
BNL-203482-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; sea level rise; arsenic, geochemistry; soil chemistry; XANES; redox

Citation Formats

LeMonte, Joshua J., Stuckey, Jason W., Sanchez, Joshua Z., Tappero, Ryan, Rinklebe, Jorg, and Sparks, Donald L.. Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b06152.
LeMonte, Joshua J., Stuckey, Jason W., Sanchez, Joshua Z., Tappero, Ryan, Rinklebe, Jorg, & Sparks, Donald L.. Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b06152
LeMonte, Joshua J., Stuckey, Jason W., Sanchez, Joshua Z., Tappero, Ryan, Rinklebe, Jorg, and Sparks, Donald L.. Thu . "Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b06152. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1434765.
@article{osti_1434765,
title = {Sea Level Rise Induced Arsenic Release from Historically Contaminated Coastal Soils},
author = {LeMonte, Joshua J. and Stuckey, Jason W. and Sanchez, Joshua Z. and Tappero, Ryan and Rinklebe, Jorg and Sparks, Donald L.},
abstractNote = {Climate change-induced perturbations in the hydrologic regime are expected to impact biogeochemical processes, including contaminant mobility and cycling. Elevated levels of geogenic and anthropogenic arsenic are found along many coasts around the world, most notably in south and southeast Asia but also in the United States, particularly along the Mid-Atlantic coast. The mechanism by and the extent to which arsenic may be released in contaminated coastal soils due to sea level rise are unknown. Here we show a series of data from a coastal arsenic-contaminated soil exposed to sea and river waters in biogeochemical microcosm reactors across field-validated redox conditions. We find that reducing conditions lead to arsenic release from historically contaminated coastal soils through reductive dissolution of arsenic-bearing mineral oxides in both sea and river water inundations, with less arsenic release from seawater scenarios than river water due to inhibition of oxide dissolution. For the first time, we systematically display gradation of solid phase soil-arsenic speciation across defined redox windows from reducing to oxidizing conditions in natural waters by combining biogeochemical microcosm experiments and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, our results demonstrate the threat of sea level rise stands to impact arsenic release from contaminated coastal soils by changing redox conditions.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.6b06152},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 11,
volume = 51,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}

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Cited by: 22 works
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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Effects of Extreme Events on Arsenic Cycling in Salt Marshes
    journal, March 2018

    • Northrup, Kristy; Capooci, Margaret; Seyfferth, Angelia L.
    • Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences, Vol. 123, Issue 3
    • DOI: 10.1002/2017jg004259

    The Fate of Chemical Pollutants with Soil Properties and Processes in the Climate Change Paradigm—A Review
    journal, September 2018


    Heavy metals status, transport mechanisms, sources, and factors affecting their mobility in Chinese agricultural soils
    journal, February 2018


    Synthesis of green marine algal-based biochar for remediation of arsenic(V) from contaminated waters in batch and column mode of operation
    journal, September 2019

    • Senthilkumar, R.; Reddy Prasad, D. M.; Govindarajan, L.
    • International Journal of Phytoremediation, Vol. 22, Issue 3
    • DOI: 10.1080/15226514.2019.1658710

    Negatives and Positives: Contaminants and Other Stressors in Aquatic Ecosystems
    journal, December 2017


    Influence of pH and Contaminant Redox Form on the Competitive Removal of Arsenic and Antimony from Aqueous Media by Coagulation
    journal, December 2018

    • Inam, Muhammad Ali; Khan, Rizwan; Park, Du Ri
    • Minerals, Vol. 8, Issue 12
    • DOI: 10.3390/min8120574