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Title: Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods

Hydrogen effects on small-volume plasticity and elastic stiffness constants are investigated with nanoindentation of Ni-201 and sonic velocity measurements of bulk Ni single crystals. Elastic modulus of Ni-201, calculated from indentation data, decreases ~22% after hydrogen charging. This substantial decrease is independently confirmed by sonic velocity measurements of Ni single crystals; c 44 decreases ~20% after hydrogen exposure. Furthermore, clear hydrogen-deformation interactions are observed. The maximum shear stress required to nucleate dislocations in hydrogen-charged Ni-201 is markedly lower than in as-annealed material, driven by hydrogen-reduced shear modulus. Additionally, a larger number of depth excursions are detected prior to general yielding in hydrogen-charged material, suggesting cross-slip restriction. Together, these data reveal direct correlation between hydrogen-affected elastic properties and plastic deformation in Ni alloys.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Southwest Research Inst. (SwRI), San Antonio, TX (United States); Kyushu Univ. (Japan). International Inst. for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER)
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.
  4. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Materials Engineering
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND-2018-2771J; LA-UR-18-20451
Journal ID: ISSN 1047-4838; 661439
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0002135; SNL-LDRD-173116; NA-0003525; AC52-06NA25396
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
JOM. Journal of the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-4838
Publisher:
Springer
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; hydrogen; nanoindentation; sonic velocity
OSTI Identifier:
1432790
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1473812

Lawrence, Samantha K., Somerday, Brian P., Ingraham, Mathew Duffy, and Bahr, David F.. Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1007/s11837-018-2850-z.
Lawrence, Samantha K., Somerday, Brian P., Ingraham, Mathew Duffy, & Bahr, David F.. Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods. United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-018-2850-z.
Lawrence, Samantha K., Somerday, Brian P., Ingraham, Mathew Duffy, and Bahr, David F.. 2018. "Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods". United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-018-2850-z.
@article{osti_1432790,
title = {Probing the Effect of Hydrogen on Elastic Properties and Plastic Deformation in Nickel Using Nanoindentation and Ultrasonic Methods},
author = {Lawrence, Samantha K. and Somerday, Brian P. and Ingraham, Mathew Duffy and Bahr, David F.},
abstractNote = {Hydrogen effects on small-volume plasticity and elastic stiffness constants are investigated with nanoindentation of Ni-201 and sonic velocity measurements of bulk Ni single crystals. Elastic modulus of Ni-201, calculated from indentation data, decreases ~22% after hydrogen charging. This substantial decrease is independently confirmed by sonic velocity measurements of Ni single crystals; c44 decreases ~20% after hydrogen exposure. Furthermore, clear hydrogen-deformation interactions are observed. The maximum shear stress required to nucleate dislocations in hydrogen-charged Ni-201 is markedly lower than in as-annealed material, driven by hydrogen-reduced shear modulus. Additionally, a larger number of depth excursions are detected prior to general yielding in hydrogen-charged material, suggesting cross-slip restriction. Together, these data reveal direct correlation between hydrogen-affected elastic properties and plastic deformation in Ni alloys.},
doi = {10.1007/s11837-018-2850-z},
journal = {JOM. Journal of the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society},
number = 7,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}