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Title: Editorial: Metabolic Interactions Between Bacteria and Phytoplankton

Abstract

Gone are the days when bacteria (and archaea) were largely ignored by oceanographers and limnologists. The study of microbes now dominates the aquatic sciences, as microbes do in activity and sometimes biomass, in most of earth's biomes (Whitman et al., 1998). Current efforts to better understand the impact of the human microbiome on our health (Cho and Blaser, 2012) underlie the major attitude change that we have had about the impact of microbial life on the rest of the world, from either unimportant or disease-causing to instrumental in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. In sunlit aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams, estuaries, and the surface ocean), we know that bacteria processes on average 50% of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis (Azam and Malfatti, 2007), remineralizing CO 2 and inorganic nutrients in the process. As such, the interactions between primary producing photoautotrophs (microalgae and cyanobacteria) and the secondary consuming and nutrient recycling heterotrophs (bacteria and archaea) are critical to understand ecosystem level processes, and it could be argued that these organisms should be studied together rather than in isolation.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1432562
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1488805
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-748810
Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X; 727
Grant/Contract Number:  
SCW1039; AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Frontiers in Microbiology Journal Volume: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
Switzerland
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Mayali, Xavier. Editorial: Metabolic Interactions Between Bacteria and Phytoplankton. Switzerland: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00727.
Mayali, Xavier. Editorial: Metabolic Interactions Between Bacteria and Phytoplankton. Switzerland. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00727.
Mayali, Xavier. Tue . "Editorial: Metabolic Interactions Between Bacteria and Phytoplankton". Switzerland. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.00727.
@article{osti_1432562,
title = {Editorial: Metabolic Interactions Between Bacteria and Phytoplankton},
author = {Mayali, Xavier},
abstractNote = {Gone are the days when bacteria (and archaea) were largely ignored by oceanographers and limnologists. The study of microbes now dominates the aquatic sciences, as microbes do in activity and sometimes biomass, in most of earth's biomes (Whitman et al., 1998). Current efforts to better understand the impact of the human microbiome on our health (Cho and Blaser, 2012) underlie the major attitude change that we have had about the impact of microbial life on the rest of the world, from either unimportant or disease-causing to instrumental in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. In sunlit aquatic ecosystems (lakes, streams, estuaries, and the surface ocean), we know that bacteria processes on average 50% of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis (Azam and Malfatti, 2007), remineralizing CO2 and inorganic nutrients in the process. As such, the interactions between primary producing photoautotrophs (microalgae and cyanobacteria) and the secondary consuming and nutrient recycling heterotrophs (bacteria and archaea) are critical to understand ecosystem level processes, and it could be argued that these organisms should be studied together rather than in isolation.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2018.00727},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 9,
place = {Switzerland},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.00727

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Cited by: 2 works
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