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Title: Global gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory of carbonyl sulfide

Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS) is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the troposphere and is an atmospheric tracer for the carbon cycle. Gridded inventories of global anthropogenic COS are used for interpreting global COS measurements. However, previous gridded anthropogenic data are a climatological estimate based on input data that is over three decades old and are not representative of current conditions. Here we develop a new gridded data set of global anthropogenic COS sources that includes more source sectors than previously available and uses the most current emissions factors and industry activity data as input. Additionally, the inventory is provided as annually varying estimates from years 1980–2012 and employs a source specific spatial scaling procedure. We estimate a global source in year 2012 of 406 Gg S y -1 (range of 223–586 Gg S y -1), which is highly concentrated in China and is twice as large as the previous gridded inventory. Our large upward revision in the bottom-up estimate of the source is consistent with a recent top-down estimate based on air-monitoring and Antarctic firn data. Furthermore, our inventory time trends, including a decline in the 1990's and growth after the year 2000, are qualitatively consistentmore » with trends in atmospheric data. Lastly, similarities between the spatial distribution in this inventory and remote sensing data suggest that the anthropogenic source could potentially play a role in explaining a missing source in the global COS budget.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [5] ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States). Sierra Nevada Research Inst.
  2. Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Studies
  3. Joint Global Change Research Inst., College Park, MD (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  5. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). JPL Earth Sciences
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Environment (1994)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Environment (1994); Journal Volume: 183; Journal ID: ISSN 1352-2310
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Carbonyl sulfide; Anthropogenic; Global; Atmospheric sources
OSTI Identifier:
1432514

Zumkehr, Andrew, Hilton, Tim, Whelan, Mary, Smith, Steve, Kuai, Le, Worden, John, and Campbell, J. Elliott. Global gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory of carbonyl sulfide. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.03.063.
Zumkehr, Andrew, Hilton, Tim, Whelan, Mary, Smith, Steve, Kuai, Le, Worden, John, & Campbell, J. Elliott. Global gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory of carbonyl sulfide. United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.03.063.
Zumkehr, Andrew, Hilton, Tim, Whelan, Mary, Smith, Steve, Kuai, Le, Worden, John, and Campbell, J. Elliott. 2018. "Global gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory of carbonyl sulfide". United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.03.063.
@article{osti_1432514,
title = {Global gridded anthropogenic emissions inventory of carbonyl sulfide},
author = {Zumkehr, Andrew and Hilton, Tim and Whelan, Mary and Smith, Steve and Kuai, Le and Worden, John and Campbell, J. Elliott},
abstractNote = {Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS or OCS) is the most abundant sulfur containing gas in the troposphere and is an atmospheric tracer for the carbon cycle. Gridded inventories of global anthropogenic COS are used for interpreting global COS measurements. However, previous gridded anthropogenic data are a climatological estimate based on input data that is over three decades old and are not representative of current conditions. Here we develop a new gridded data set of global anthropogenic COS sources that includes more source sectors than previously available and uses the most current emissions factors and industry activity data as input. Additionally, the inventory is provided as annually varying estimates from years 1980–2012 and employs a source specific spatial scaling procedure. We estimate a global source in year 2012 of 406 Gg S y-1 (range of 223–586 Gg S y-1), which is highly concentrated in China and is twice as large as the previous gridded inventory. Our large upward revision in the bottom-up estimate of the source is consistent with a recent top-down estimate based on air-monitoring and Antarctic firn data. Furthermore, our inventory time trends, including a decline in the 1990's and growth after the year 2000, are qualitatively consistent with trends in atmospheric data. Lastly, similarities between the spatial distribution in this inventory and remote sensing data suggest that the anthropogenic source could potentially play a role in explaining a missing source in the global COS budget.},
doi = {10.1016/j.atmosenv.2018.03.063},
journal = {Atmospheric Environment (1994)},
number = ,
volume = 183,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}