skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Accessing microfluidics through feature-based design software for 3D printing

Additive manufacturing has been a cornerstone of the product development pipeline for decades, playing an essential role in the creation of both functional and cosmetic prototypes. In recent years, the prospects for distributed and open source manufacturing have grown tremendously. This growth has been enabled by an expanding library of printable materials, low-cost printers, and communities dedicated to platform development. The microfluidics community has embraced this opportunity to integrate 3D printing into the suite of manufacturing strategies used to create novel fluidic architectures. The rapid turnaround time and low cost to implement these strategies in the lab makes 3D printing an attractive alternative to conventional micro- and nanofabrication techniques. In this work, the production of multiple microfluidic architectures using a hybrid 3D printing-soft lithography approach is demonstrated and shown to enable rapid device fabrication with channel dimensions that take advantage of laminar flow characteristics. The fabrication process outlined here is underpinned by the implementation of custom design software with an integrated slicer program that replaces less intuitive computer aided design and slicer software tools. Devices are designed in the program by assembling parameterized microfluidic building blocks. The fabrication process and flow control within 3D printed devices were demonstrated with amore » gradient generator and two droplet generator designs. Precise control over the printing process allowed 3D microfluidics to be printed in a single step by extruding bridge structures to ‘jump-over’ channels in the same plane. This strategy was shown to integrate with conventional nanofabrication strategies to simplify the operation of a platform that incorporates both nanoscale features and 3D printed microfluidics.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). The Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). The Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences Division. Biosciences Division
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; 1R01DE024463-01
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Science Foundation (NSF); National Inst. of Health (NIH) (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 3D printing; microfluidics; software design; fluidics; computer software; built structures; manufacturing processes; acetones
OSTI Identifier:
1430401
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1468205

Shankles, Peter G., Millet, Larry J., Aufrecht, Jayde A., and Retterer, Scott T.. Accessing microfluidics through feature-based design software for 3D printing. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0192752.
Shankles, Peter G., Millet, Larry J., Aufrecht, Jayde A., & Retterer, Scott T.. Accessing microfluidics through feature-based design software for 3D printing. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0192752.
Shankles, Peter G., Millet, Larry J., Aufrecht, Jayde A., and Retterer, Scott T.. 2018. "Accessing microfluidics through feature-based design software for 3D printing". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0192752.
@article{osti_1430401,
title = {Accessing microfluidics through feature-based design software for 3D printing},
author = {Shankles, Peter G. and Millet, Larry J. and Aufrecht, Jayde A. and Retterer, Scott T.},
abstractNote = {Additive manufacturing has been a cornerstone of the product development pipeline for decades, playing an essential role in the creation of both functional and cosmetic prototypes. In recent years, the prospects for distributed and open source manufacturing have grown tremendously. This growth has been enabled by an expanding library of printable materials, low-cost printers, and communities dedicated to platform development. The microfluidics community has embraced this opportunity to integrate 3D printing into the suite of manufacturing strategies used to create novel fluidic architectures. The rapid turnaround time and low cost to implement these strategies in the lab makes 3D printing an attractive alternative to conventional micro- and nanofabrication techniques. In this work, the production of multiple microfluidic architectures using a hybrid 3D printing-soft lithography approach is demonstrated and shown to enable rapid device fabrication with channel dimensions that take advantage of laminar flow characteristics. The fabrication process outlined here is underpinned by the implementation of custom design software with an integrated slicer program that replaces less intuitive computer aided design and slicer software tools. Devices are designed in the program by assembling parameterized microfluidic building blocks. The fabrication process and flow control within 3D printed devices were demonstrated with a gradient generator and two droplet generator designs. Precise control over the printing process allowed 3D microfluidics to be printed in a single step by extruding bridge structures to ‘jump-over’ channels in the same plane. This strategy was shown to integrate with conventional nanofabrication strategies to simplify the operation of a platform that incorporates both nanoscale features and 3D printed microfluidics.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0192752},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 3,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}