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Title: Use of in-field bioreactors demonstrate groundwater filtration influences planktonic bacterial community assembly, but not biofilm composition

Using in-field bioreactors, we investigated the influence of exogenous microorganisms in groundwater planktonic and biofilm microbial communities as part of the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC). After an acclimation period with source groundwater, bioreactors received either filtered (0.22 μM filter) or unfiltered well groundwater in triplicate and communities were tracked routinely for 23 days after filtration was initiated. To address geochemical influences, the planktonic phase was assayed periodically for protein, organic acids, physico-/geochemical measurements and bacterial community (via 16S rRNA gene sequencing), while biofilms (i.e. microbial growth on sediment coupons) were targeted for bacterial community composition at the completion of the experiment (23 d). Based on Bray-Curtis distance, planktonic bacterial community composition varied temporally and between treatments (filtered, unfiltered bioreactors). Notably, filtration led to an increase in the dominant genus, Zoogloea relative abundance over time within the planktonic community, while remaining relatively constant when unfiltered. At day 23, biofilm communities were more taxonomically and phylogenetically diverse and substantially different from planktonic bacterial communities; however, the biofilm bacterial communities were similar regardless of filtration. These results suggest that although planktonic communities were sensitive to groundwater filtration, bacterial biofilm communities were stable and resistant to filtration. Bioreactors are useful tools in addressingmore » questions pertaining to microbial community assembly and succession. These data provide a first step in understanding how an extrinsic factor, such as a groundwater inoculation and flux of microbial colonizers, impact how microbial communities assemble in environmental systems.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [4] ;  [5] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division
  2. Marshall Univ., Huntington, WV (United States). Biological Sciences Dept.
  3. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Biosciences Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; AC02-05CH11231; OIA-1458952
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1427332
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1435278; OSTI ID: 1465439; OSTI ID: 1465450

Christensen, Geoffrey A., Moon, Ji Won, Veach, Allison M., Mosher, Jennifer J., Wymore, Ann, Van Nostrand, Joy D., Zhou, Jizhong, Hazen, Terry C., Arkin, Adam, and Elias, Dwayne A.. Use of in-field bioreactors demonstrate groundwater filtration influences planktonic bacterial community assembly, but not biofilm composition. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0194663.
Christensen, Geoffrey A., Moon, Ji Won, Veach, Allison M., Mosher, Jennifer J., Wymore, Ann, Van Nostrand, Joy D., Zhou, Jizhong, Hazen, Terry C., Arkin, Adam, & Elias, Dwayne A.. Use of in-field bioreactors demonstrate groundwater filtration influences planktonic bacterial community assembly, but not biofilm composition. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0194663.
Christensen, Geoffrey A., Moon, Ji Won, Veach, Allison M., Mosher, Jennifer J., Wymore, Ann, Van Nostrand, Joy D., Zhou, Jizhong, Hazen, Terry C., Arkin, Adam, and Elias, Dwayne A.. 2018. "Use of in-field bioreactors demonstrate groundwater filtration influences planktonic bacterial community assembly, but not biofilm composition". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0194663.
@article{osti_1427332,
title = {Use of in-field bioreactors demonstrate groundwater filtration influences planktonic bacterial community assembly, but not biofilm composition},
author = {Christensen, Geoffrey A. and Moon, Ji Won and Veach, Allison M. and Mosher, Jennifer J. and Wymore, Ann and Van Nostrand, Joy D. and Zhou, Jizhong and Hazen, Terry C. and Arkin, Adam and Elias, Dwayne A.},
abstractNote = {Using in-field bioreactors, we investigated the influence of exogenous microorganisms in groundwater planktonic and biofilm microbial communities as part of the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC). After an acclimation period with source groundwater, bioreactors received either filtered (0.22 μM filter) or unfiltered well groundwater in triplicate and communities were tracked routinely for 23 days after filtration was initiated. To address geochemical influences, the planktonic phase was assayed periodically for protein, organic acids, physico-/geochemical measurements and bacterial community (via 16S rRNA gene sequencing), while biofilms (i.e. microbial growth on sediment coupons) were targeted for bacterial community composition at the completion of the experiment (23 d). Based on Bray-Curtis distance, planktonic bacterial community composition varied temporally and between treatments (filtered, unfiltered bioreactors). Notably, filtration led to an increase in the dominant genus, Zoogloea relative abundance over time within the planktonic community, while remaining relatively constant when unfiltered. At day 23, biofilm communities were more taxonomically and phylogenetically diverse and substantially different from planktonic bacterial communities; however, the biofilm bacterial communities were similar regardless of filtration. These results suggest that although planktonic communities were sensitive to groundwater filtration, bacterial biofilm communities were stable and resistant to filtration. Bioreactors are useful tools in addressing questions pertaining to microbial community assembly and succession. These data provide a first step in understanding how an extrinsic factor, such as a groundwater inoculation and flux of microbial colonizers, impact how microbial communities assemble in environmental systems.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0194663},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 3,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

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