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Title: Performance of Different “Lab-On-Chip” Geometries for Making Double Emulsions to Form Polystyrene Shells

Abstract

Fluid properties and the geometry of lab-on-chip (LOC) designs together affect the formation of double emulsions for making inertial confinement fusion targets. Critical fluid properties include the fluids’ velocities and interfacial tension—a coupled effect that is best characterized by the capillary number (Ca)—and the relative volumetric flow rates (φ). The important geometry of the LOC is the orientation of the channels where they intersect (junction) and the spacing between successive junctions. T-junctions and focus-flow devices were tested. The latter geometry of a double cross (focus flow) performed better: single-emulsion droplets were formed over a wide range of fluid parameters (0.03 < φ < 0.17 and 0.0003 < Ca < 0.001) at the first junction, and double emulsions were formed over a more limited range (φ > 0.5 and Ca < 0.4) at the second junction. A LOC design using the focus-flow design formed water–oil–water (W/O/W) double emulsions with the oil phase containing polystyrene. The double emulsions yielded shells with an outer dimension ranging from 2.3±0.07 mm to 4.3±0.23 mm and a wall thickness ranging from 30 μm to 1.6 mm. Thus, the value of the flow-rate ratio at the second junction provided the most-effective parameter for controlling the inner diameter,more » outer diameter, and wall thickness of the shell.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics
  2. Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)
OSTI Identifier:
1427163
Report Number(s):
2016-252, 1383
Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055; 2017-252, 1383, 2340
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0001944
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fusion Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 73; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: 22nd Target Fabrication Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, 12-16 March 2017; Journal ID: ISSN 1536-1055
Publisher:
American Nuclear Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Viza, N. D., and Harding, D. R. Performance of Different “Lab-On-Chip” Geometries for Making Double Emulsions to Form Polystyrene Shells. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1080/15361055.2017.1391662.
Viza, N. D., & Harding, D. R. Performance of Different “Lab-On-Chip” Geometries for Making Double Emulsions to Form Polystyrene Shells. United States. doi:10.1080/15361055.2017.1391662.
Viza, N. D., and Harding, D. R. Wed . "Performance of Different “Lab-On-Chip” Geometries for Making Double Emulsions to Form Polystyrene Shells". United States. doi:10.1080/15361055.2017.1391662. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1427163.
@article{osti_1427163,
title = {Performance of Different “Lab-On-Chip” Geometries for Making Double Emulsions to Form Polystyrene Shells},
author = {Viza, N. D. and Harding, D. R.},
abstractNote = {Fluid properties and the geometry of lab-on-chip (LOC) designs together affect the formation of double emulsions for making inertial confinement fusion targets. Critical fluid properties include the fluids’ velocities and interfacial tension—a coupled effect that is best characterized by the capillary number (Ca)—and the relative volumetric flow rates (φ). The important geometry of the LOC is the orientation of the channels where they intersect (junction) and the spacing between successive junctions. T-junctions and focus-flow devices were tested. The latter geometry of a double cross (focus flow) performed better: single-emulsion droplets were formed over a wide range of fluid parameters (0.03 < φ < 0.17 and 0.0003 < Ca < 0.001) at the first junction, and double emulsions were formed over a more limited range (φ > 0.5 and Ca < 0.4) at the second junction. A LOC design using the focus-flow design formed water–oil–water (W/O/W) double emulsions with the oil phase containing polystyrene. The double emulsions yielded shells with an outer dimension ranging from 2.3±0.07 mm to 4.3±0.23 mm and a wall thickness ranging from 30 μm to 1.6 mm. Thus, the value of the flow-rate ratio at the second junction provided the most-effective parameter for controlling the inner diameter, outer diameter, and wall thickness of the shell.},
doi = {10.1080/15361055.2017.1391662},
journal = {Fusion Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 73,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Figures / Tables:

Fig. 1 Fig. 1: Several device designs for making O1/W/O2 double emulsions for resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) shells and W1/O/W2 for polystyrene shells. Flow directions are as indicated. The dashed line on each figure represents the division between the first (left) and second (right) junction of the device. The first design (a) representsmore » a standard double T-junction design by stacking two circular T-junction channels together. The second design (b) positions two smaller channels (2.03 mm) closely together to form a double emulsion in a single step. A focus-flow design (c) shows single dispersion channels augmented by opposing dispersion channels, forming a “double-cross” device. Two devices were tested for making polystyrene shells. (d) A T-junction and (e) focus-flow design were constructed from BK7 glass with Teflon added to the first intersection in the focus-flow device.« less

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    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.