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Title: Advanced Characterization Techniques for Sodium-Ion Battery Studies

Sodium (Na)-ion batteries (NIBs) are considered promising alternative candidates to the well-commercialized lithium-ion batteries, especially for applications in large-scale energy storage systems. The electrochemical performance of NIBs such as the cyclability, rate capability, and voltage profiles are strongly dependent on the structural and morphological evolution, phase transformation, sodium-ion diffusion, and electrode/electrolyte interface reconstruction during charge–discharge cycling. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the structure and kinetics of electrode materials and the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is essential for optimizing current NIB systems and exploring new materials for NIBs. Recently, rapid progress and development in spectroscopic, microscopic, and scattering techniques have provided extensive insight into the nature of structural evolution, morphological changes of electrode materials, and electrode/electrolyte interface in NIBs. Here in this review, a comprehensive overview of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ or in operando) techniques for studying the NIBs is provided. Lastly, special focus is placed on how these techniques are applied to the fundamental investigation of NIB systems and what important results are obtained.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [2] ;  [4] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Division
  2. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Beijing National Lab. for Condensed Matter Physics, Inst. of Physics
  3. Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Materials Science
  4. Xiamen Univ., Xiamen (China). State Key Lab. for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, and Dept. of Chemistry
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
BNL-203321-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832; TRN: US1802059
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 17; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley
Research Org:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; characterization techniques; ex situ; in situ; sodium-ion batteries
OSTI Identifier:
1425180
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1422010

Shadike, Zulipiya, Zhao, Enyue, Zhou, Yong-Ning, Yu, Xiqian, Yang, Yong, Hu, Enyuan, Bak, Seongmin, Gu, Lin, and Yang, Xiao-Qing. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Sodium-Ion Battery Studies. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201702588.
Shadike, Zulipiya, Zhao, Enyue, Zhou, Yong-Ning, Yu, Xiqian, Yang, Yong, Hu, Enyuan, Bak, Seongmin, Gu, Lin, & Yang, Xiao-Qing. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Sodium-Ion Battery Studies. United States. doi:10.1002/aenm.201702588.
Shadike, Zulipiya, Zhao, Enyue, Zhou, Yong-Ning, Yu, Xiqian, Yang, Yong, Hu, Enyuan, Bak, Seongmin, Gu, Lin, and Yang, Xiao-Qing. 2018. "Advanced Characterization Techniques for Sodium-Ion Battery Studies". United States. doi:10.1002/aenm.201702588.
@article{osti_1425180,
title = {Advanced Characterization Techniques for Sodium-Ion Battery Studies},
author = {Shadike, Zulipiya and Zhao, Enyue and Zhou, Yong-Ning and Yu, Xiqian and Yang, Yong and Hu, Enyuan and Bak, Seongmin and Gu, Lin and Yang, Xiao-Qing},
abstractNote = {Sodium (Na)-ion batteries (NIBs) are considered promising alternative candidates to the well-commercialized lithium-ion batteries, especially for applications in large-scale energy storage systems. The electrochemical performance of NIBs such as the cyclability, rate capability, and voltage profiles are strongly dependent on the structural and morphological evolution, phase transformation, sodium-ion diffusion, and electrode/electrolyte interface reconstruction during charge–discharge cycling. Therefore, in-depth understanding of the structure and kinetics of electrode materials and the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is essential for optimizing current NIB systems and exploring new materials for NIBs. Recently, rapid progress and development in spectroscopic, microscopic, and scattering techniques have provided extensive insight into the nature of structural evolution, morphological changes of electrode materials, and electrode/electrolyte interface in NIBs. Here in this review, a comprehensive overview of both static (ex situ) and real-time (in situ or in operando) techniques for studying the NIBs is provided. Lastly, special focus is placed on how these techniques are applied to the fundamental investigation of NIB systems and what important results are obtained.},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201702588},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = 17,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}