skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Network for Photovoltaic Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  2. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Network for Photovoltaic Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center
  3. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Network for Photovoltaic Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0004946
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanophotonics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nanophotonics (Online); Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2192-8614
Publisher:
de Gruyter
Research Org:
Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; radiative cooling; nanophotonics; selective thermal emission; photovoltaics; infrared detectors; thermophotovoltaics; emissive energy harvesters
OSTI Identifier:
1424949

Sun, Xingshu, Sun, Yubo, Zhou, Zhiguang, Alam, Muhammad Ashraful, and Bermel, Peter. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1515/nanoph-2017-0020.
Sun, Xingshu, Sun, Yubo, Zhou, Zhiguang, Alam, Muhammad Ashraful, & Bermel, Peter. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications. United States. doi:10.1515/nanoph-2017-0020.
Sun, Xingshu, Sun, Yubo, Zhou, Zhiguang, Alam, Muhammad Ashraful, and Bermel, Peter. 2017. "Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications". United States. doi:10.1515/nanoph-2017-0020. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1424949.
@article{osti_1424949,
title = {Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications},
author = {Sun, Xingshu and Sun, Yubo and Zhou, Zhiguang and Alam, Muhammad Ashraful and Bermel, Peter},
abstractNote = {Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.},
doi = {10.1515/nanoph-2017-0020},
journal = {Nanophotonics (Online)},
number = 5,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {7}
}