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Title: Evidence for Ecological Flexibility in the Cosmopolitan Genus Curtobacterium

Assigning ecological roles to bacterial taxa remains imperative to understanding how microbial communities will respond to changing environmental conditions. Here we analyze the genus Curtobacterium, as it was found to be the most abundant taxon in a leaf litter community in southern California. Traditional characterization of this taxon predominantly associates it as the causal pathogen in the agricultural crops of dry beans. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether the abundance of this genus was because of its role as a plant pathogen or another ecological role. By collating >24,000 16S rRNA sequences with 120 genomes across the Microbacteriaceae family, we show that Curtobacterium has a global distribution with a predominant presence in soil ecosystems. Moreover, this genus harbors a high diversity of genomic potential for the degradation of carbohydrates, specifically with regards to structural polysaccharides. We conclude that Curtobacterium may be responsible for the degradation of organic matter within litter communities.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)
  2. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  3. California State Univ. (CalState), Long Beach, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
sc0008749
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Research Org:
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Decomposition; Leaf Litter; Glycoside Hydrolases; Microbacteriaceae; Actinobacteria
OSTI Identifier:
1423874

Chase, Alexander B., Arevalo, Philip, Polz, Martin F., Berlemont, Renaud, and Martiny, Jennifer B. H.. Evidence for Ecological Flexibility in the Cosmopolitan Genus Curtobacterium. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.01874.
Chase, Alexander B., Arevalo, Philip, Polz, Martin F., Berlemont, Renaud, & Martiny, Jennifer B. H.. Evidence for Ecological Flexibility in the Cosmopolitan Genus Curtobacterium. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.01874.
Chase, Alexander B., Arevalo, Philip, Polz, Martin F., Berlemont, Renaud, and Martiny, Jennifer B. H.. 2016. "Evidence for Ecological Flexibility in the Cosmopolitan Genus Curtobacterium". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.01874. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1423874.
@article{osti_1423874,
title = {Evidence for Ecological Flexibility in the Cosmopolitan Genus Curtobacterium},
author = {Chase, Alexander B. and Arevalo, Philip and Polz, Martin F. and Berlemont, Renaud and Martiny, Jennifer B. H.},
abstractNote = {Assigning ecological roles to bacterial taxa remains imperative to understanding how microbial communities will respond to changing environmental conditions. Here we analyze the genus Curtobacterium, as it was found to be the most abundant taxon in a leaf litter community in southern California. Traditional characterization of this taxon predominantly associates it as the causal pathogen in the agricultural crops of dry beans. Therefore, we sought to investigate whether the abundance of this genus was because of its role as a plant pathogen or another ecological role. By collating >24,000 16S rRNA sequences with 120 genomes across the Microbacteriaceae family, we show that Curtobacterium has a global distribution with a predominant presence in soil ecosystems. Moreover, this genus harbors a high diversity of genomic potential for the degradation of carbohydrates, specifically with regards to structural polysaccharides. We conclude that Curtobacterium may be responsible for the degradation of organic matter within litter communities.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2016.01874},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {11}
}

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