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Title: Microphysical Characteristics of Squall-Line Stratiform Precipitation and Transition Zones Simulated Using an Ice Particle Property-Evolving Model

Abstract

A quasi-idealized 3D squall-line case is simulated using a novel bulk microphysics scheme called the Ice-Spheroids Habit Model with Aspect-ratio Evolution (ISHMAEL). In ISHMAEL, the evolution of ice particle properties (e.g., mass, shape, maximum diameter, density, and fall speed) are predicted during vapor growth, sublimation, riming, and melting, allowing ice properties to evolve from various microphysical processes without needing separate unrimed and rimed ice categories. ISHMAEL produces both a transition zone and an enhanced stratiform precipitation region, and ice particle properties are analyzed to determine the characteristics of ice that lead to the development of these squall-line features. Rimed particles advected rearward from the convective region produce the enhanced stratiform precipitation region. The transition zone results from hydrometeor sorting; the evolution of ice particle properties in the convective region leads to fall speeds that favor ice advecting rearward of the transition zone before reaching the melting level, causing a local minimum in precipitation rate and reflectivity there. Sensitivity studies show that the fall speed of ice particles largely determines the location of the enhanced stratiform precipitation region and whether or not a transition zone forms. Finally, the representation of microphysical processes, such as rime splintering and aggregation, and ice sizemore » distribution shape can impact the mean ice particle fall speeds enough to significantly impact the location of the enhanced stratiform precipitation region and the existence of the transition zone.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado
  2. The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1423725
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1541865
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012827
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Monthly Weather Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Monthly Weather Review Journal Volume: 146 Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-0644
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; meteorology & atmospheric sciences; cloud microphysics; convective storms; ice particles; cloud parameterizations

Citation Formats

Jensen, Anders A., Harrington, Jerry Y., and Morrison, Hugh. Microphysical Characteristics of Squall-Line Stratiform Precipitation and Transition Zones Simulated Using an Ice Particle Property-Evolving Model. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-17-0215.1.
Jensen, Anders A., Harrington, Jerry Y., & Morrison, Hugh. Microphysical Characteristics of Squall-Line Stratiform Precipitation and Transition Zones Simulated Using an Ice Particle Property-Evolving Model. United States. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-17-0215.1.
Jensen, Anders A., Harrington, Jerry Y., and Morrison, Hugh. Thu . "Microphysical Characteristics of Squall-Line Stratiform Precipitation and Transition Zones Simulated Using an Ice Particle Property-Evolving Model". United States. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-17-0215.1.
@article{osti_1423725,
title = {Microphysical Characteristics of Squall-Line Stratiform Precipitation and Transition Zones Simulated Using an Ice Particle Property-Evolving Model},
author = {Jensen, Anders A. and Harrington, Jerry Y. and Morrison, Hugh},
abstractNote = {A quasi-idealized 3D squall-line case is simulated using a novel bulk microphysics scheme called the Ice-Spheroids Habit Model with Aspect-ratio Evolution (ISHMAEL). In ISHMAEL, the evolution of ice particle properties (e.g., mass, shape, maximum diameter, density, and fall speed) are predicted during vapor growth, sublimation, riming, and melting, allowing ice properties to evolve from various microphysical processes without needing separate unrimed and rimed ice categories. ISHMAEL produces both a transition zone and an enhanced stratiform precipitation region, and ice particle properties are analyzed to determine the characteristics of ice that lead to the development of these squall-line features. Rimed particles advected rearward from the convective region produce the enhanced stratiform precipitation region. The transition zone results from hydrometeor sorting; the evolution of ice particle properties in the convective region leads to fall speeds that favor ice advecting rearward of the transition zone before reaching the melting level, causing a local minimum in precipitation rate and reflectivity there. Sensitivity studies show that the fall speed of ice particles largely determines the location of the enhanced stratiform precipitation region and whether or not a transition zone forms. Finally, the representation of microphysical processes, such as rime splintering and aggregation, and ice size distribution shape can impact the mean ice particle fall speeds enough to significantly impact the location of the enhanced stratiform precipitation region and the existence of the transition zone.},
doi = {10.1175/MWR-D-17-0215.1},
journal = {Monthly Weather Review},
number = 3,
volume = 146,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1175/MWR-D-17-0215.1

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2 works
Citation information provided by
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