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Title: Interactions that know no boundaries

Abstract

Deviations from an ideal crystal lead to diffuse scattering (DS) intensity, both between and beneath the Bragg peaks in diffraction patterns (Guinier, 1963). First characterized using simple ionic crystals in early studies of X-ray diffraction (Lonsdale, 1942), DS has a rich history (Welberry & Weber, 2016) and is a well established technique in smallmolecule crystallography (Welberry, 2004). DS studies in macromolecular crystallography began more recently (Phillips et al., 1980) and now the potential for obtaining information about protein motions is fueling the growing interest in DS (Meisburger et al., 2017).

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1423383
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1425771
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-20721
Journal ID: ISSN 2052-2525; IUCRAJ; PII: S2052252518002713
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
IUCrJ
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: IUCrJ Journal Volume: 5 Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2052-2525
Publisher:
International Union of Crystallography (IUCr)
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Biological Science

Citation Formats

Wall, Michael E. Interactions that know no boundaries. United Kingdom: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1107/S2052252518002713.
Wall, Michael E. Interactions that know no boundaries. United Kingdom. doi:10.1107/S2052252518002713.
Wall, Michael E. Mon . "Interactions that know no boundaries". United Kingdom. doi:10.1107/S2052252518002713.
@article{osti_1423383,
title = {Interactions that know no boundaries},
author = {Wall, Michael E.},
abstractNote = {Deviations from an ideal crystal lead to diffuse scattering (DS) intensity, both between and beneath the Bragg peaks in diffraction patterns (Guinier, 1963). First characterized using simple ionic crystals in early studies of X-ray diffraction (Lonsdale, 1942), DS has a rich history (Welberry & Weber, 2016) and is a well established technique in smallmolecule crystallography (Welberry, 2004). DS studies in macromolecular crystallography began more recently (Phillips et al., 1980) and now the potential for obtaining information about protein motions is fueling the growing interest in DS (Meisburger et al., 2017).},
doi = {10.1107/S2052252518002713},
journal = {IUCrJ},
number = 2,
volume = 5,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1107/S2052252518002713

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