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Title: Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures

Here, the detection of radioactive noble gases is a primary technology for verifying compliance with the pending Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A fundamental challenge in applying this technology for detecting underground nuclear explosions is estimating the timing and magnitude of the radionuclide signatures. While the primary mechanism for transport is advective transport, either through barometric pumping or thermally driven advection, diffusive transport in the surrounding matrix also plays a secondary role. From the study of primordial noble gas signatures, it is known that xenon has a strong physical adsorption affinity in shale formations. Given the unselective nature of physical adsorption, isotherm measurements reported here show that non-trivial amounts of xenon adsorb on a variety of media, in addition to shale. A dual-porosity model is then discussed demonstrating that sorption amplifies the diffusive uptake of an adsorbing matrix from a fracture. This effect may reduce the radioxenon signature down to approximately one-tenth, similar to primordial xenon isotopic signatures.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2]
  1. The Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SIAA14AVCVTT008; HDTRA1-12-1-0009; AC05-76RL01830
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 187; Journal ID: ISSN 0265-931X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1420871

Paul, M. J., Biegalski, S. R., Haas, D. A., Jiang, H., Daigle, H., and Lowrey, J. D.. Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2018.01.029.
Paul, M. J., Biegalski, S. R., Haas, D. A., Jiang, H., Daigle, H., & Lowrey, J. D.. Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2018.01.029.
Paul, M. J., Biegalski, S. R., Haas, D. A., Jiang, H., Daigle, H., and Lowrey, J. D.. 2018. "Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2018.01.029. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1420871.
@article{osti_1420871,
title = {Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures},
author = {Paul, M. J. and Biegalski, S. R. and Haas, D. A. and Jiang, H. and Daigle, H. and Lowrey, J. D.},
abstractNote = {Here, the detection of radioactive noble gases is a primary technology for verifying compliance with the pending Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A fundamental challenge in applying this technology for detecting underground nuclear explosions is estimating the timing and magnitude of the radionuclide signatures. While the primary mechanism for transport is advective transport, either through barometric pumping or thermally driven advection, diffusive transport in the surrounding matrix also plays a secondary role. From the study of primordial noble gas signatures, it is known that xenon has a strong physical adsorption affinity in shale formations. Given the unselective nature of physical adsorption, isotherm measurements reported here show that non-trivial amounts of xenon adsorb on a variety of media, in addition to shale. A dual-porosity model is then discussed demonstrating that sorption amplifies the diffusive uptake of an adsorbing matrix from a fracture. This effect may reduce the radioxenon signature down to approximately one-tenth, similar to primordial xenon isotopic signatures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jenvrad.2018.01.029},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Radioactivity},
number = ,
volume = 187,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}