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Title: Cross-species functional diversity within the PIN auxin efflux protein family

In Arabidopsis, development during flowering is coordinated by transport of the hormone auxin mediated by polar-localized PIN-FORMED1 (AtPIN1). However Arabidopsis has lost a PIN clade sister to AtPIN1, Sister-of-PIN1 (SoPIN1), which is conserved in flowering plants. Here, we previously proposed that the AtPIN1 organ initiation and vein patterning functions are split between the SoPIN1 and PIN1 clades in grasses. Here we show that in the grass Brachypodium sopin1 mutants have organ initiation defects similar to Arabidopsis atpin1, while loss of PIN1 function in Brachypodium has little effect on organ initiation but alters stem growth. Heterologous expression of Brachypodium SoPIN1 and PIN1b in Arabidopsis provides further evidence of functional specificity. SoPIN1 but not PIN1b can mediate flower formation in null atpin1 mutants, although both can complement a missense allele. The behavior of SoPIN1 and PIN1b in Arabidopsis illustrates how membrane and tissue-level accumulation, transport activity, and interaction contribute to PIN functional specificity.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Sainsbury Lab.
  2. US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)., Albany, CA (United States). Agricultural Research Service, Western Regional Research Center
  3. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AI02-07ER64452
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
eLife
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-084X
Publisher:
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd.
Research Org:
Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1417010

O'Connor, Devin Lee, Elton, Samuel, Ticchiarelli, Fabrizio, Hsia, Mon Mandy, Vogel, John P., and Leyser, Ottoline. Cross-species functional diversity within the PIN auxin efflux protein family. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.7554/eLife.31804.
O'Connor, Devin Lee, Elton, Samuel, Ticchiarelli, Fabrizio, Hsia, Mon Mandy, Vogel, John P., & Leyser, Ottoline. Cross-species functional diversity within the PIN auxin efflux protein family. United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.31804.
O'Connor, Devin Lee, Elton, Samuel, Ticchiarelli, Fabrizio, Hsia, Mon Mandy, Vogel, John P., and Leyser, Ottoline. 2017. "Cross-species functional diversity within the PIN auxin efflux protein family". United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.31804. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1417010.
@article{osti_1417010,
title = {Cross-species functional diversity within the PIN auxin efflux protein family},
author = {O'Connor, Devin Lee and Elton, Samuel and Ticchiarelli, Fabrizio and Hsia, Mon Mandy and Vogel, John P. and Leyser, Ottoline},
abstractNote = {In Arabidopsis, development during flowering is coordinated by transport of the hormone auxin mediated by polar-localized PIN-FORMED1 (AtPIN1). However Arabidopsis has lost a PIN clade sister to AtPIN1, Sister-of-PIN1 (SoPIN1), which is conserved in flowering plants. Here, we previously proposed that the AtPIN1 organ initiation and vein patterning functions are split between the SoPIN1 and PIN1 clades in grasses. Here we show that in the grass Brachypodium sopin1 mutants have organ initiation defects similar to Arabidopsis atpin1, while loss of PIN1 function in Brachypodium has little effect on organ initiation but alters stem growth. Heterologous expression of Brachypodium SoPIN1 and PIN1b in Arabidopsis provides further evidence of functional specificity. SoPIN1 but not PIN1b can mediate flower formation in null atpin1 mutants, although both can complement a missense allele. The behavior of SoPIN1 and PIN1b in Arabidopsis illustrates how membrane and tissue-level accumulation, transport activity, and interaction contribute to PIN functional specificity.},
doi = {10.7554/eLife.31804},
journal = {eLife},
number = ,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}