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Title: Physical origins of current and temperature controlled negative differential resistances in NbO 2

Negative differential resistance behavior in oxide memristors, especially those using NbO 2, is gaining renewed interest because of its potential utility in neuromorphic computing. However, there has been a decade-long controversy over whether the negative differential resistance is caused by a relatively low-temperature non-linear transport mechanism or a high-temperature Mott transition. Resolving this issue will enable consistent and robust predictive modeling of this phenomenon for different applications. Here in this paper, we examine NbO 2 memristors that exhibit both a current-controlled and a temperature-controlled negative differential resistance. Through thermal and chemical spectromicroscopy and numerical simulations, we confirm that the former is caused by a ~400 K non-linear-transport-driven instability and the latter is caused by the ~1000 K Mott metal-insulator transition, for which the thermal conductance counter-intuitively decreases in the metallic state relative to the insulating state.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ; ORCiD logo [3] ;  [3] ;  [1]
  1. Hewlett Packard Labs, Palo Alto, CA (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; 2017-17013000002; ECS-9731293
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1416938

Kumar, Suhas, Wang, Ziwen, Davila, Noraica, Kumari, Niru, Norris, Kate J., Huang, Xiaopeng, Strachan, John Paul, Vine, David, Kilcoyne, A. L. David, Nishi, Yoshio, and Williams, R. Stanley. Physical origins of current and temperature controlled negative differential resistances in NbO2. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00773-4.
Kumar, Suhas, Wang, Ziwen, Davila, Noraica, Kumari, Niru, Norris, Kate J., Huang, Xiaopeng, Strachan, John Paul, Vine, David, Kilcoyne, A. L. David, Nishi, Yoshio, & Williams, R. Stanley. Physical origins of current and temperature controlled negative differential resistances in NbO2. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00773-4.
Kumar, Suhas, Wang, Ziwen, Davila, Noraica, Kumari, Niru, Norris, Kate J., Huang, Xiaopeng, Strachan, John Paul, Vine, David, Kilcoyne, A. L. David, Nishi, Yoshio, and Williams, R. Stanley. 2017. "Physical origins of current and temperature controlled negative differential resistances in NbO2". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00773-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416938.
@article{osti_1416938,
title = {Physical origins of current and temperature controlled negative differential resistances in NbO2},
author = {Kumar, Suhas and Wang, Ziwen and Davila, Noraica and Kumari, Niru and Norris, Kate J. and Huang, Xiaopeng and Strachan, John Paul and Vine, David and Kilcoyne, A. L. David and Nishi, Yoshio and Williams, R. Stanley},
abstractNote = {Negative differential resistance behavior in oxide memristors, especially those using NbO2, is gaining renewed interest because of its potential utility in neuromorphic computing. However, there has been a decade-long controversy over whether the negative differential resistance is caused by a relatively low-temperature non-linear transport mechanism or a high-temperature Mott transition. Resolving this issue will enable consistent and robust predictive modeling of this phenomenon for different applications. Here in this paper, we examine NbO2 memristors that exhibit both a current-controlled and a temperature-controlled negative differential resistance. Through thermal and chemical spectromicroscopy and numerical simulations, we confirm that the former is caused by a ~400 K non-linear-transport-driven instability and the latter is caused by the ~1000 K Mott metal-insulator transition, for which the thermal conductance counter-intuitively decreases in the metallic state relative to the insulating state.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-017-00773-4},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}

Works referenced in this record:

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