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Title: Visualizing chemical functionality in plant cell walls

Understanding plant cell wall cross-linking chemistry and polymeric architecture is key to the efficient utilization of biomass in all prospects from rational genetic modification to downstream chemical and biological conversion to produce fuels and value chemicals. In fact, the bulk properties of cell wall recalcitrance are collectively determined by its chemical features over a wide range of length scales from tissue, cellular to polymeric architectures. Microscopic visualization of cell walls from the nanometer to the micrometer scale offers an in situ approach to study their chemical functionality considering its spatial and chemical complexity, particularly the capabilities of characterizing biomass non-destructively and in real-time during conversion processes. Microscopic characterization has revealed heterogeneity in the distribution of chemical features, which would otherwise be hidden in bulk analysis. Key microscopic features include cell wall type, wall layering, and wall composition - especially cellulose and lignin distributions. Microscopic tools, such as atomic force microscopy, stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy, have been applied to investigations of cell wall structure and chemistry from the native wall to wall treated by thermal chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. While advancing our current understanding of plant cell wall recalcitrance and deconstruction, microscopic tools with improved spatial resolutionmore » will steadily enhance our fundamental understanding of cell wall function.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ;  [2]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Biosciences Center; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Department of Plant Biology
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-2700-70484
Journal ID: ISSN 1754-6834
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; FC02-07ER64494
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biotechnology for Biofuels
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1754-6834
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Research Org:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; plant cell wall; cell wall imaging; biomass recalcitrance; bioenergy; lignocellulosic biomass; stimulated raman scattering; atomic force microscopy; fluorescence; fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy
OSTI Identifier:
1416720

Zeng, Yining, Himmel, Michael E., and Ding, Shi-You. Visualizing chemical functionality in plant cell walls. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1186/s13068-017-0953-3.
Zeng, Yining, Himmel, Michael E., & Ding, Shi-You. Visualizing chemical functionality in plant cell walls. United States. doi:10.1186/s13068-017-0953-3.
Zeng, Yining, Himmel, Michael E., and Ding, Shi-You. 2017. "Visualizing chemical functionality in plant cell walls". United States. doi:10.1186/s13068-017-0953-3. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1416720.
@article{osti_1416720,
title = {Visualizing chemical functionality in plant cell walls},
author = {Zeng, Yining and Himmel, Michael E. and Ding, Shi-You},
abstractNote = {Understanding plant cell wall cross-linking chemistry and polymeric architecture is key to the efficient utilization of biomass in all prospects from rational genetic modification to downstream chemical and biological conversion to produce fuels and value chemicals. In fact, the bulk properties of cell wall recalcitrance are collectively determined by its chemical features over a wide range of length scales from tissue, cellular to polymeric architectures. Microscopic visualization of cell walls from the nanometer to the micrometer scale offers an in situ approach to study their chemical functionality considering its spatial and chemical complexity, particularly the capabilities of characterizing biomass non-destructively and in real-time during conversion processes. Microscopic characterization has revealed heterogeneity in the distribution of chemical features, which would otherwise be hidden in bulk analysis. Key microscopic features include cell wall type, wall layering, and wall composition - especially cellulose and lignin distributions. Microscopic tools, such as atomic force microscopy, stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy, have been applied to investigations of cell wall structure and chemistry from the native wall to wall treated by thermal chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. While advancing our current understanding of plant cell wall recalcitrance and deconstruction, microscopic tools with improved spatial resolution will steadily enhance our fundamental understanding of cell wall function.},
doi = {10.1186/s13068-017-0953-3},
journal = {Biotechnology for Biofuels},
number = 1,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}

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