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This content will become publicly available on October 24, 2018

Title: Observation of the Kaiser Effect Using Noble Gas Release Signals

The Kaiser effect was defined in the early 1950s (Kaiser 1953) and was extensively reviewed and evaluated by Lavrov (2002) with a view toward understanding stress estimations. The Kaiser effect is a stress memory phenomenon which has most often been demonstrated in rock using acoustic emissions. During cyclic loading–unloading–reloading, the acoustic emissions are near zero until the load exceeds the level of the previous load cycle. Here, we sought to explore the Kaiser effect in rock using real-time noble gas release. Laboratory studies using real-time mass spectrometry measurements during deformation have quantified, to a degree, the types of gases released (Bauer et al. 2016a, b), their release rates and amounts during deformation, estimates of permeability created from pore structure modifications during deformation (Gardner et al. 2017) and the impact of mineral plasticity upon gas release. We found that noble gases contained in brittle crystalline rock are readily released during deformation.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Research
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-6379J
Journal ID: ISSN 0723-2632; PII: 1324; TRN: US1800244
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0723-2632
Publisher:
Springer
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1411605