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Title: Seasonality of Formic Acid (HCOOH) in London during the ClearfLo Campaign

Abstract

Following measurements in the winter of 2012, formic acid (HCOOH) and nitric acid (HNO 3) were measured using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the Summer Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign in London, 2012. Consequently, the seasonal dependence of formic acid sources could be better understood. A mean formic acid concentration of 1.3 ppb and a maximum of 12.7 ppb was measured which is significantly greater than that measured during the winter campaign (0.63 ppb and 6.7 ppb, respectively). Daily calibrations of formic acid during the summer campaign gave sensitivities of 1.2 ion counts s -1 parts per trillion (ppt) by volume -1 and a limit of detection of 34 ppt. During the summer campaign, there was no correlation between formic acid and anthropogenic emissions such as NO x and CO or peaks associated with the rush hour as was identified in the winter. Rather, peaks in formic acid were observed that correlated with solar irradiance. Analysis using a photochemical trajectory model has been conducted to determine the source of this formic acid. The contribution of formic acid formation through ozonolysis of alkenes is important but the secondary production from biogenic VOCs could be the most dominant sourcemore » of formic acid at this measurement site during the summer.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [3];  [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [2];  [7]
  1. Centre for Atmospheric Science, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental ScienceUniversity of Manchester Manchester UK
  2. Biogeochemistry Research Centre, School of ChemistryUniversity of Bristol Bristol UK
  3. National Centre for Atmospheric ScienceUniversity of York York UK, Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of ChemistryUniversity of York York UK
  4. Wolfson Atmospheric Chemistry Laboratories, Department of ChemistryUniversity of York York UK
  5. National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Department of ChemistryUniversity of Leicester Leicester UK
  6. Combustion Research FacilitySandia National Laboratories Livermore CA USA
  7. Centre for Atmospheric Science, School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental ScienceUniversity of Manchester Manchester UK, Now at Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology Pasadena CA USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1410365
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1410366; OSTI ID: 1414437
Report Number(s):
[SAND-2017-13269J]
[Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X]
Grant/Contract Number:  
[DE‐AC04‐94‐AL85000; AC04-94AL85000]
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
[Journal Name: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres Journal Volume: 122 Journal Issue: 22]; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Bannan, Thomas J., Murray Booth, A., Le Breton, Michael, Bacak, Asan, Muller, Jennifer B. A., Leather, Kimberley E., Khan, M. Anwar H., Lee, James D., Dunmore, Rachel E., Hopkins, James R., Fleming, Zoë L., Sheps, Leonid, Taatjes, Craig A., Shallcross, Dudley E., and Percival, Carl J. Seasonality of Formic Acid (HCOOH) in London during the ClearfLo Campaign. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2017JD027064.
Bannan, Thomas J., Murray Booth, A., Le Breton, Michael, Bacak, Asan, Muller, Jennifer B. A., Leather, Kimberley E., Khan, M. Anwar H., Lee, James D., Dunmore, Rachel E., Hopkins, James R., Fleming, Zoë L., Sheps, Leonid, Taatjes, Craig A., Shallcross, Dudley E., & Percival, Carl J. Seasonality of Formic Acid (HCOOH) in London during the ClearfLo Campaign. United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD027064.
Bannan, Thomas J., Murray Booth, A., Le Breton, Michael, Bacak, Asan, Muller, Jennifer B. A., Leather, Kimberley E., Khan, M. Anwar H., Lee, James D., Dunmore, Rachel E., Hopkins, James R., Fleming, Zoë L., Sheps, Leonid, Taatjes, Craig A., Shallcross, Dudley E., and Percival, Carl J. Fri . "Seasonality of Formic Acid (HCOOH) in London during the ClearfLo Campaign". United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD027064.
@article{osti_1410365,
title = {Seasonality of Formic Acid (HCOOH) in London during the ClearfLo Campaign},
author = {Bannan, Thomas J. and Murray Booth, A. and Le Breton, Michael and Bacak, Asan and Muller, Jennifer B. A. and Leather, Kimberley E. and Khan, M. Anwar H. and Lee, James D. and Dunmore, Rachel E. and Hopkins, James R. and Fleming, Zoë L. and Sheps, Leonid and Taatjes, Craig A. and Shallcross, Dudley E. and Percival, Carl J.},
abstractNote = {Following measurements in the winter of 2012, formic acid (HCOOH) and nitric acid (HNO3) were measured using a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) during the Summer Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign in London, 2012. Consequently, the seasonal dependence of formic acid sources could be better understood. A mean formic acid concentration of 1.3 ppb and a maximum of 12.7 ppb was measured which is significantly greater than that measured during the winter campaign (0.63 ppb and 6.7 ppb, respectively). Daily calibrations of formic acid during the summer campaign gave sensitivities of 1.2 ion counts s-1 parts per trillion (ppt) by volume-1 and a limit of detection of 34 ppt. During the summer campaign, there was no correlation between formic acid and anthropogenic emissions such as NOx and CO or peaks associated with the rush hour as was identified in the winter. Rather, peaks in formic acid were observed that correlated with solar irradiance. Analysis using a photochemical trajectory model has been conducted to determine the source of this formic acid. The contribution of formic acid formation through ozonolysis of alkenes is important but the secondary production from biogenic VOCs could be the most dominant source of formic acid at this measurement site during the summer.},
doi = {10.1002/2017JD027064},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = [22],
volume = [122],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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DOI: 10.1002/2017JD027064

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