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Title: Overview of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) experimental design and organization

By coordinating the design and distribution of global climate model simulations of the past, current, and future climate, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) has become one of the foundational elements of climate science. However, the need to address an ever-expanding range of scientific questions arising from more and more research communities has made it necessary to revise the organization of CMIP. After a long and wide community consultation, a new and more federated structure has been put in place. It consists of three major elements: (1) a handful of common experiments, the DECK (Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima) and CMIP historical simulations (1850–near present) that will maintain continuity and help document basic characteristics of models across different phases of CMIP; (2) common standards, coordination, infrastructure, and documentation that will facilitate the distribution of model outputs and the characterization of the model ensemble; and (3) an ensemble of CMIP-Endorsed Model Intercomparison Projects (MIPs) that will be specific to a particular phase of CMIP (now CMIP6) and that will build on the DECK and CMIP historical simulations to address a large range of specific questions and fill the scientific gaps of the previous CMIP phases. The DECK and CMIP historical simulations, together withmore » the use of CMIP data standards, will be the entry cards for models participating in CMIP. Participation in CMIP6-Endorsed MIPs by individual modelling groups will be at their own discretion and will depend on their scientific interests and priorities. With the Grand Science Challenges of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) as its scientific backdrop, CMIP6 will address three broad questions: – How does the Earth system respond to forcing? – What are the origins and consequences of systematic model biases? – How can we assess future climate changes given internal climate variability, predictability, and uncertainties in scenarios? This CMIP6 overview paper presents the background and rationale for the new structure of CMIP, provides a detailed description of the DECK and CMIP6 historical simulations, and includes a brief introduction to the 21 CMIP6-Endorsed MIPs.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7]
  1. Institut fur Physik der Atmosphare, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)
  2. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (LMD/IPSL), CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France). Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique
  3. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)
  4. Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)
  5. Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)
  6. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory/NOAA, Princeton, NJ (United States)
  7. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-736881
Journal ID: ISSN 1991-9603
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; FC02-97ER62402
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Geoscientific Model Development (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Geoscientific Model Development (Online); Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1991-9603
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1408987