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Title: A temporary hiatus in warming of extreme temperatures is not unusual, nor inconsistent with model simulations of human-induced climate change

Sillman et al (2014) find that observed trends of extremely hot days and cold nights are consistent with the current generation of climate models. Short periods of localized decreases in these extreme temperatures are not unusual and the Sillman et al results increase confidence in projections of future changes in extreme temperature.
Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1407240

Wehner, Michael F. A temporary hiatus in warming of extreme temperatures is not unusual, nor inconsistent with model simulations of human-induced climate change. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/071001.
Wehner, Michael F. A temporary hiatus in warming of extreme temperatures is not unusual, nor inconsistent with model simulations of human-induced climate change. United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/071001.
Wehner, Michael F. 2014. "A temporary hiatus in warming of extreme temperatures is not unusual, nor inconsistent with model simulations of human-induced climate change". United States. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/071001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1407240.
@article{osti_1407240,
title = {A temporary hiatus in warming of extreme temperatures is not unusual, nor inconsistent with model simulations of human-induced climate change},
author = {Wehner, Michael F.},
abstractNote = {Sillman et al (2014) find that observed trends of extremely hot days and cold nights are consistent with the current generation of climate models. Short periods of localized decreases in these extreme temperatures are not unusual and the Sillman et al results increase confidence in projections of future changes in extreme temperature.},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/9/7/071001},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 7,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {7}
}