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Title: Neotropical peatland methane emissions along a vegetation and biogeochemical gradient

Abstract

Tropical wetlands are thought to be the most important source of interannual variability in atmospheric methane (CH 4) concentrations, yet sparse data prevents them from being incorporated into Earth system models. This problem is particularly pronounced in the neotropics where bottom-up models based on water table depth are incongruent with top-down inversion models suggesting unaccounted sinks or sources of CH 4. The newly documented vast areas of peatlands in the Amazon basin may account for an important unrecognized CH 4 source, but the hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of CH 4 dynamics from these systems remain poorly understood. We studied three zones of a peatland in Madre de Dios, Peru, to test whether CH 4 emissions and pore water concentrations varied with vegetation community, soil chemistry and proximity to groundwater sources. We found that the open-canopy herbaceous zone emitted roughly one-third as much CH 4 as the Mauritia flexuosa palm-dominated areas (4.7 ± 0.9 and 14.0 ± 2.4 mg CH 4 m -2 h -1, respectively). Emissions decreased with distance from groundwater discharge across the three sampling sites, and tracked changes in soil carbon chemistry, especially increased soil phenolics. Based on all available data, we calculate that neotropical peatlands contribute emissionsmore » of 43 ± 11.9 Tg CH 4 y -1, however this estimate is subject to geographic bias and will need revision once additional studies are published.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Duke Univ. Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment
  2. Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1400440
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1499886
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012272
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT

Citation Formats

Winton, R. Scott, Flanagan, Neal, Richardson, Curtis J., and Rinnan, Riikka. Neotropical peatland methane emissions along a vegetation and biogeochemical gradient. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0187019.
Winton, R. Scott, Flanagan, Neal, Richardson, Curtis J., & Rinnan, Riikka. Neotropical peatland methane emissions along a vegetation and biogeochemical gradient. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0187019.
Winton, R. Scott, Flanagan, Neal, Richardson, Curtis J., and Rinnan, Riikka. Fri . "Neotropical peatland methane emissions along a vegetation and biogeochemical gradient". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0187019.
@article{osti_1400440,
title = {Neotropical peatland methane emissions along a vegetation and biogeochemical gradient},
author = {Winton, R. Scott and Flanagan, Neal and Richardson, Curtis J. and Rinnan, Riikka},
abstractNote = {Tropical wetlands are thought to be the most important source of interannual variability in atmospheric methane (CH4) concentrations, yet sparse data prevents them from being incorporated into Earth system models. This problem is particularly pronounced in the neotropics where bottom-up models based on water table depth are incongruent with top-down inversion models suggesting unaccounted sinks or sources of CH4. The newly documented vast areas of peatlands in the Amazon basin may account for an important unrecognized CH4 source, but the hydrologic and biogeochemical controls of CH4 dynamics from these systems remain poorly understood. We studied three zones of a peatland in Madre de Dios, Peru, to test whether CH4 emissions and pore water concentrations varied with vegetation community, soil chemistry and proximity to groundwater sources. We found that the open-canopy herbaceous zone emitted roughly one-third as much CH4 as the Mauritia flexuosa palm-dominated areas (4.7 ± 0.9 and 14.0 ± 2.4 mg CH4 m-2 h-1, respectively). Emissions decreased with distance from groundwater discharge across the three sampling sites, and tracked changes in soil carbon chemistry, especially increased soil phenolics. Based on all available data, we calculate that neotropical peatlands contribute emissions of 43 ± 11.9 Tg CH4 y-1, however this estimate is subject to geographic bias and will need revision once additional studies are published.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0187019},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 10,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187019

Figures / Tables:

Fig 1 Fig 1: Map of the Los Amigos peatland in Madre de Dios, Peru, with sampling locations marked by stars. Basin Periphery: -12.55664 S, -70.1117 W; Basin Interior: -12.55926 S, -70.11702 W; Intrabasin Flats: -12.55947 S, -70.12037 W. Background image from ArcMap 10.3.

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Methane Flux from Forested Wetland Soils of the Great Dismal Swamp, USA
    journal, June 2019


      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.