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Title: Associations between diagnostic patterns and stages in ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in women and remains the most deadly gynecological cancer. The disease places a debilitating burden on the US population, in terms of mortality, morbidity, individual suffering and loss of productivity for all women with OvCa. National expenditures for OvCa care were estimated at $5.12B in 2010. The high fatality of OvCa is attributed to the fact that most patients are diagnosed at a late stage, with 63% diagnosed at Stage III or later. Effective early-stage diagnosis is challenging because there are no approved screening procedures for the general population, which has led to OvCa being termed1 the “silent killer”. We have previously shown that public awareness and knowledge about OvCa is poor among the general population. It has also been reported that ovarian masses have often been misdiagnosed, although there was some association of pre-diagnostic symptoms with OvCa and with OvCa diagnostic stages. The motivation for the current study was to examine the association of diagnostic patterns (determined by the responses from ‘frontline’ clinicians, specifically primary care physicians (PCPs) and emergency room (ER) doctors, together with follow-up by specialists), with OvCa stages.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [2]
  1. Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics
  2. Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Center for Statistical Research, Computing and Collaboration (SR2c), Dept. of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences
  4. State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Binghamton, NY (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences
  5. Univ. Hospitals, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of OB/GYN-Gynecological Oncology
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-6463J
Journal ID: ISSN 1574-1699; 654620
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Model Assisted Statistics and Applications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1574-1699
Publisher:
IOS Press
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1399505

Bogie, Kath, Xu, Yifan, Ma, Junheng, Zhang, Adah, Wang, Yuanyuan, Zanotti, Kristine, and Sun, Jiayang. Associations between diagnostic patterns and stages in ovarian cancer. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3233/mas-170402.
Bogie, Kath, Xu, Yifan, Ma, Junheng, Zhang, Adah, Wang, Yuanyuan, Zanotti, Kristine, & Sun, Jiayang. Associations between diagnostic patterns and stages in ovarian cancer. United States. doi:10.3233/mas-170402.
Bogie, Kath, Xu, Yifan, Ma, Junheng, Zhang, Adah, Wang, Yuanyuan, Zanotti, Kristine, and Sun, Jiayang. 2017. "Associations between diagnostic patterns and stages in ovarian cancer". United States. doi:10.3233/mas-170402. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399505.
@article{osti_1399505,
title = {Associations between diagnostic patterns and stages in ovarian cancer},
author = {Bogie, Kath and Xu, Yifan and Ma, Junheng and Zhang, Adah and Wang, Yuanyuan and Zanotti, Kristine and Sun, Jiayang},
abstractNote = {Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in women and remains the most deadly gynecological cancer. The disease places a debilitating burden on the US population, in terms of mortality, morbidity, individual suffering and loss of productivity for all women with OvCa. National expenditures for OvCa care were estimated at $5.12B in 2010. The high fatality of OvCa is attributed to the fact that most patients are diagnosed at a late stage, with 63% diagnosed at Stage III or later. Effective early-stage diagnosis is challenging because there are no approved screening procedures for the general population, which has led to OvCa being termed1 the “silent killer”. We have previously shown that public awareness and knowledge about OvCa is poor among the general population. It has also been reported that ovarian masses have often been misdiagnosed, although there was some association of pre-diagnostic symptoms with OvCa and with OvCa diagnostic stages. The motivation for the current study was to examine the association of diagnostic patterns (determined by the responses from ‘frontline’ clinicians, specifically primary care physicians (PCPs) and emergency room (ER) doctors, together with follow-up by specialists), with OvCa stages.},
doi = {10.3233/mas-170402},
journal = {Model Assisted Statistics and Applications},
number = 3,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}