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Title: Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Perovskite SrSnO 3 Nanocrystals in Ionic Liquids for Photocatalytic Applications

Nanosized SrSnO 3 photocatalysts have been successfully synthesized by microwave synthesis in various ionic liquids (ILs) followed by a heat treatment process to optimize the materials’ crystallinity. The influence of the ILs with various cations such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C 4mim] +), 6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)hexane ([C 6(mim) 2] 2+), butylpyridinium ([C 4Py] +), and tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium ([P 66614] +) and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([Tf 2N] -) as the anion on the structure, crystallization, and morphology of the products was investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area analysis by gas adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), diffuse reflectance UV–vis spectroscopy, and Raman and IR spectroscopy. According to structure characterization by XRD and Raman spectroscopy all samples crystallized phase-pure in the orthorhombic GdFeO 3 perovskite structure type. SEM reveals that, on the basis of the IL, the obtained SrSnO 3 nanoparticles exhibit different morphologies and sizes. Rod-shaped particles are formed in [C 4mim][Tf 2N], [C 6(mim) 2][Tf 2N] 2, and [P 66614][Tf 2N]. However, the particle dimensions and size distribution vary depending on the IL and range from quite thin and long needlelike particles with a narrow size distribution obtained in [P 66614][Tf 2N] to relatively larger particles withmore » a broader size distribution obtained in [C 6(mim) 2][Tf 2N] 2. In contrast, in [C 4Py][Tf 2N] nanospheres with a diameter of about 50 nm form. For these particles the highest photocatalytic activity was observed. Our investigations indicate that the improved photocatalytic activity of this material results from the synergistic effect of the relatively large surface area associated with nanosize and an appropriate energy band structure.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Center for Catalysis; Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany). Faculty of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  2. Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany). Faculty of Chemistry and Biochemistry
  3. Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany). Faculty of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Univ. of Oldenburg (Germany). Inst. of Chemistry
  4. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Center for Catalysis; Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany). Faculty of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Materials and Environmental Chemistry
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
IS-J9378
Journal ID: ISSN 0020-1669
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Inorganic Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 0020-1669
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Research Org:
Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Ruhr Univ., Bochum (Germany); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1399481