skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Advances in Plant ER Architecture and Dynamics

Abstract

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic subcellular compartment that is essential to eukaryotic life because it contributes significantly to the synthesis of fundamental building blocks of the cell, including proteins and lipids, and it acts as an important architectural scaffold to maintain a well-organized spatial distribution of the other endomembrane organelles. Recent analyses with live cell imaging coupled with genetics studies have brought to light the incredible dynamism of this organelle and the underlying drivers as well as the impact of the ER organization on the general cellular homeostasis and plant growth. In this review, we highlight the most recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that enable the morphological integrity of the plant ER in relation to the other organelles and the cytoskeleton. The endomembrane system comprises endocytic and biosynthetic cellular processes that are closely integrated. At the core of the endomembrane system lies the ER, an essential and largely pleiotropic organelle. With its network of interconnected tubules and flattened cisternae, the ER represents the organelle with the largest membrane surface area and can be considered as the gatekeeper of the secretory pathway that controls multiple checkpoints in protein biosynthesis: folding, quality control, signaling, and degradation. Inmore » addition to proteins such as receptors, ion channels, and enzymes, the ER synthesizes a wide variety of cargo molecules that control a large spectrum of physiological and essential processes, and are eventually shipped from the ER or retained in this organelle (Aridor and Hannan, 2000; Kim and Brandizzi, 2016; Brandizzi, 2017). Furthermore, with its function in controlling protein synthesis and folding, the ER has an important role in abiotic and biotic stress resistance through the unfolded protein response signaling (Angelos et al., 2017). The ER also is an important cellular compartment for calcium storage and carbohydrate metabolism (Vitale and Denecke, 1999; Vitale and Galili, 2001).« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. MSU-DOE Plant Research Lab and Plant Biology Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1398525
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1596313
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-91ER20021
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Plant Physiology (Bethesda)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Plant Physiology (Bethesda) Journal Volume: 176 Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0032-0889
Publisher:
American Society of Plant Biologists
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Stefano, Giovanni, and Brandizzi, Federica. Advances in Plant ER Architecture and Dynamics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1104/pp.17.01261.
Stefano, Giovanni, & Brandizzi, Federica. Advances in Plant ER Architecture and Dynamics. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.01261
Stefano, Giovanni, and Brandizzi, Federica. Fri . "Advances in Plant ER Architecture and Dynamics". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.01261.
@article{osti_1398525,
title = {Advances in Plant ER Architecture and Dynamics},
author = {Stefano, Giovanni and Brandizzi, Federica},
abstractNote = {The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic subcellular compartment that is essential to eukaryotic life because it contributes significantly to the synthesis of fundamental building blocks of the cell, including proteins and lipids, and it acts as an important architectural scaffold to maintain a well-organized spatial distribution of the other endomembrane organelles. Recent analyses with live cell imaging coupled with genetics studies have brought to light the incredible dynamism of this organelle and the underlying drivers as well as the impact of the ER organization on the general cellular homeostasis and plant growth. In this review, we highlight the most recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms that enable the morphological integrity of the plant ER in relation to the other organelles and the cytoskeleton. The endomembrane system comprises endocytic and biosynthetic cellular processes that are closely integrated. At the core of the endomembrane system lies the ER, an essential and largely pleiotropic organelle. With its network of interconnected tubules and flattened cisternae, the ER represents the organelle with the largest membrane surface area and can be considered as the gatekeeper of the secretory pathway that controls multiple checkpoints in protein biosynthesis: folding, quality control, signaling, and degradation. In addition to proteins such as receptors, ion channels, and enzymes, the ER synthesizes a wide variety of cargo molecules that control a large spectrum of physiological and essential processes, and are eventually shipped from the ER or retained in this organelle (Aridor and Hannan, 2000; Kim and Brandizzi, 2016; Brandizzi, 2017). Furthermore, with its function in controlling protein synthesis and folding, the ER has an important role in abiotic and biotic stress resistance through the unfolded protein response signaling (Angelos et al., 2017). The ER also is an important cellular compartment for calcium storage and carbohydrate metabolism (Vitale and Denecke, 1999; Vitale and Galili, 2001).},
doi = {10.1104/pp.17.01261},
journal = {Plant Physiology (Bethesda)},
number = 1,
volume = 176,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.01261

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referencing / citing this record:

Quantitative analysis of plant ER architecture and dynamics
journal, February 2019

  • Pain, Charlotte; Kriechbaumer, Verena; Kittelmann, Maike
  • Nature Communications, Vol. 10, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-08893-9

Endoplasmic reticulum-localized CCX2 is required for osmotolerance by regulating ER and cytosolic Ca 2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis
journal, March 2018

  • Corso, Massimiliano; Doccula, Fabrizio G.; de Melo, J. Romário F.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 115, Issue 15
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1720422115

Communications Between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Other Organelles During Abiotic Stress Response in Plants
journal, June 2019


Homeostasis of branched-chain amino acids is critical for the activity of TOR signaling in Arabidopsis
journal, December 2019