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Title: Thermal adaptation of net ecosystem exchange

Abstract

Thermal adaptation of gross primary production and ecosystem respiration has been well documented over broad thermal gradients. However, no study has examined their interaction as a function of temperature, i.e. the thermal responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE). Here in this study, we constructed temperature response curves of NEE against temperature using 380 site-years of eddy covariance data at 72 forest, grassland and shrubland ecosystems located at latitudes ranging from ~29° N to 64° N. The response curves were used to define two critical temperatures: transition temperature (T b) at which ecosystem transfer from carbon source to sink and optimal temperature (T o) at which carbon uptake is maximized. T b was strongly correlated with annual mean air temperature. T o was strongly correlated with mean temperature during the net carbon uptake period across the study ecosystems. Our results imply that the net ecosystem exchange of carbon adapts to the temperature across the geographical range due to intrinsic connections between vegetation primary production and ecosystem respiration.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [16];  [11];  [11];  [17];  [18] more »;  [19];  [20];  [21];  [22];  [23];  [24] « less
  1. Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China). College of Global Change and Earth System Science; Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology
  2. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology
  3. Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China). College of Global Change and Earth System Science; Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Geography
  4. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Research Network, Inst. of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research
  5. Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Inst. of Botany; Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology
  6. Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
  7. Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences
  8. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Dept.
  9. Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Analysis
  10. Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). Dept. of Biology
  11. Univ. of Antwerp, Wilrijk (Belgium). Dept. of Biology
  12. McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). School of Geography and Earth Sciences, and McMaster Centre for Climate Change
  13. Dresden Univ. of Technology (Germany). Inst. of Hydrology and Meteorology
  14. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States). Biospheric Science
  15. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division
  16. Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Atmospheric Science Program, Geography Dept.
  17. Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Champenoux (France)
  18. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Lab. for Atmospheric Research, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  19. Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Inst.
  20. Inst. for Agricultural and Forestry Systems in the Mediterranean, Via Cavour (Italy)
  21. ESS-CC, Alterra Wageningen UR, Wageningen (The Netherlands)
  22. US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)., Tucson, AZ (United States). Southwest Watershed Research Center
  23. European Commission, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre, Inst. for Environment and Sustainability
  24. Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Inst. for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space and Earth Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Key Basic Research and Development Plan of China; National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1396247
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357; FG02-006ER64317
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biogeosciences (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Biogeosciences (Online); Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1726-4189
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Yuan, W., Luo, Y., Liang, S., Yu, G., Niu, S., Stoy, P., Chen, J., Desai, A. R., Lindroth, A., Gough, C. M., Ceulemans, R., Arain, A., Bernhofer, C., Cook, B., Cook, D. R., Dragoni, D., Gielen, B., Janssens, I. A., Longdoz, B., Liu, H., Lund, M., Matteucci, G., Moors, E., Scott, R. L., Seufert, G., and Varner, R. Thermal adaptation of net ecosystem exchange. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.5194/bg-8-1453-2011.
Yuan, W., Luo, Y., Liang, S., Yu, G., Niu, S., Stoy, P., Chen, J., Desai, A. R., Lindroth, A., Gough, C. M., Ceulemans, R., Arain, A., Bernhofer, C., Cook, B., Cook, D. R., Dragoni, D., Gielen, B., Janssens, I. A., Longdoz, B., Liu, H., Lund, M., Matteucci, G., Moors, E., Scott, R. L., Seufert, G., & Varner, R. Thermal adaptation of net ecosystem exchange. United States. doi:10.5194/bg-8-1453-2011.
Yuan, W., Luo, Y., Liang, S., Yu, G., Niu, S., Stoy, P., Chen, J., Desai, A. R., Lindroth, A., Gough, C. M., Ceulemans, R., Arain, A., Bernhofer, C., Cook, B., Cook, D. R., Dragoni, D., Gielen, B., Janssens, I. A., Longdoz, B., Liu, H., Lund, M., Matteucci, G., Moors, E., Scott, R. L., Seufert, G., and Varner, R. Mon . "Thermal adaptation of net ecosystem exchange". United States. doi:10.5194/bg-8-1453-2011. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1396247.
@article{osti_1396247,
title = {Thermal adaptation of net ecosystem exchange},
author = {Yuan, W. and Luo, Y. and Liang, S. and Yu, G. and Niu, S. and Stoy, P. and Chen, J. and Desai, A. R. and Lindroth, A. and Gough, C. M. and Ceulemans, R. and Arain, A. and Bernhofer, C. and Cook, B. and Cook, D. R. and Dragoni, D. and Gielen, B. and Janssens, I. A. and Longdoz, B. and Liu, H. and Lund, M. and Matteucci, G. and Moors, E. and Scott, R. L. and Seufert, G. and Varner, R.},
abstractNote = {Thermal adaptation of gross primary production and ecosystem respiration has been well documented over broad thermal gradients. However, no study has examined their interaction as a function of temperature, i.e. the thermal responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE). Here in this study, we constructed temperature response curves of NEE against temperature using 380 site-years of eddy covariance data at 72 forest, grassland and shrubland ecosystems located at latitudes ranging from ~29° N to 64° N. The response curves were used to define two critical temperatures: transition temperature (Tb) at which ecosystem transfer from carbon source to sink and optimal temperature (To) at which carbon uptake is maximized. Tb was strongly correlated with annual mean air temperature. To was strongly correlated with mean temperature during the net carbon uptake period across the study ecosystems. Our results imply that the net ecosystem exchange of carbon adapts to the temperature across the geographical range due to intrinsic connections between vegetation primary production and ecosystem respiration.},
doi = {10.5194/bg-8-1453-2011},
journal = {Biogeosciences (Online)},
number = 6,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {6}
}

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