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Title: Variable Streamflow Contributions in Nested Subwatersheds of a US Midwestern Urban Watershed

Quantification of runoff is critical to estimate and control water pollution in urban regions, but variation in impervious area and land-use type can complicate the quantification of runoff. We quantified the streamflow contributions of subwatersheds and the historical changes in streamflow in a flood prone urbanizing watershed in US Midwest to guide the establishment of a future pollution-control plan. Streamflow data from five nested hydrological stations enabled accurate estimations of streamflow contribution from five subwatersheds with variable impervious areas (from 0.5% to 26.6%). We corrected the impact of Missouri river backwatering at the most downstream station by comparing its streamflow with an upstream station using double-mass analysis combined with Bernaola-Galvan Heuristic Segmentation approach. We also compared the streamflow of the urbanizing watershed with seven surrounding rural watersheds to estimate the cumulative impact of urbanization on the streamflow regime. The two most urbanized subwatersheds contributed >365 mm streamflow in 2012 with 657 mm precipitation, which was more than fourfold greater than the two least urbanized subwatersheds. Runoff occurred almost exclusively over the most urbanized subwatersheds during the dry period. The frequent floods occurred and the same amount of precipitation produced ~100 mm more streamflow in 2008–2014 than 1967–1980 in the urbanizingmore » watershed; such phenomena did not occur in surrounding rural watersheds. Our approaches provide comprehensive information for planning on runoff control and pollutant reduction in urban watersheds.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
  2. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)
  3. Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-26446
Journal ID: ISSN 0920-4741
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0920-4741
Publisher:
Springer
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
Hinkson Creek Collaborative Adaptive Management (CAM) program, Missouri Department of Conservation; USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; nested watersheds, double-mass analysis, urban stream syndrome, backwater
OSTI Identifier:
1396116

Wei, Liang, Hubbart, Jason A., and Zhou, Hang. Variable Streamflow Contributions in Nested Subwatersheds of a US Midwestern Urban Watershed. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1007/s11269-017-1804-5.
Wei, Liang, Hubbart, Jason A., & Zhou, Hang. Variable Streamflow Contributions in Nested Subwatersheds of a US Midwestern Urban Watershed. United States. doi:10.1007/s11269-017-1804-5.
Wei, Liang, Hubbart, Jason A., and Zhou, Hang. 2017. "Variable Streamflow Contributions in Nested Subwatersheds of a US Midwestern Urban Watershed". United States. doi:10.1007/s11269-017-1804-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1396116.
@article{osti_1396116,
title = {Variable Streamflow Contributions in Nested Subwatersheds of a US Midwestern Urban Watershed},
author = {Wei, Liang and Hubbart, Jason A. and Zhou, Hang},
abstractNote = {Quantification of runoff is critical to estimate and control water pollution in urban regions, but variation in impervious area and land-use type can complicate the quantification of runoff. We quantified the streamflow contributions of subwatersheds and the historical changes in streamflow in a flood prone urbanizing watershed in US Midwest to guide the establishment of a future pollution-control plan. Streamflow data from five nested hydrological stations enabled accurate estimations of streamflow contribution from five subwatersheds with variable impervious areas (from 0.5% to 26.6%). We corrected the impact of Missouri river backwatering at the most downstream station by comparing its streamflow with an upstream station using double-mass analysis combined with Bernaola-Galvan Heuristic Segmentation approach. We also compared the streamflow of the urbanizing watershed with seven surrounding rural watersheds to estimate the cumulative impact of urbanization on the streamflow regime. The two most urbanized subwatersheds contributed >365 mm streamflow in 2012 with 657 mm precipitation, which was more than fourfold greater than the two least urbanized subwatersheds. Runoff occurred almost exclusively over the most urbanized subwatersheds during the dry period. The frequent floods occurred and the same amount of precipitation produced ~100 mm more streamflow in 2008–2014 than 1967–1980 in the urbanizing watershed; such phenomena did not occur in surrounding rural watersheds. Our approaches provide comprehensive information for planning on runoff control and pollutant reduction in urban watersheds.},
doi = {10.1007/s11269-017-1804-5},
journal = {Water Resources Management},
number = 1,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}