skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: The Turbulent Structure of the Arctic Summer Boundary Layer During The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study

The mostly ice covered Arctic Ocean is dominated by low-level liquid- or mixed-phase clouds.Turbulence within stratocumulus is primarily driven by cloud top cooling that induces convective instability. Using a suite of in situ and remote sensing instruments we characterize turbulent mixing in Arctic stratocumulus, and for the first time we estimate profiles of the gradient Richardson number at relatively high resolution in both time (10 min) and altitude (10 m). It is found that the mixing occurs both within the cloud,as expected, and by wind shear instability near the surface. About 75% of the time these two layers are separated by a stably stratified inversion at 100–200 m altitude. Exceptions are associated with low cloud bases that allow the cloud-driven turbulence to reach the surface. Lastly, the results imply that turbulent coupling between the surface and the cloud is sporadic or intermittent.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [3] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [1] ; ORCiD logo [5] ;  [6] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)
  2. Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden)
  3. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  4. CNRM-GAME (Meteo-France and CNRS), Toulouse (France)
  5. Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)
  6. Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Norrkoping (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0007005; SC0011918
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 122; Journal Issue: 18; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-897X
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Research Org:
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Arctic; boundary layer; turbulence; remote sensing; clouds
OSTI Identifier:
1395400
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1395401; OSTI ID: 1466742

Brooks, Ian M., Tjernström, Michael, Persson, P. Ola G., Shupe, Matthew D., Atkinson, Rebecca A., Canut, Guylaine, Birch, Cathryn E., Mauritsen, Thorsten, Sedlar, Joseph, and Brooks, Barbara J.. The Turbulent Structure of the Arctic Summer Boundary Layer During The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1002/2017JD027234.
Brooks, Ian M., Tjernström, Michael, Persson, P. Ola G., Shupe, Matthew D., Atkinson, Rebecca A., Canut, Guylaine, Birch, Cathryn E., Mauritsen, Thorsten, Sedlar, Joseph, & Brooks, Barbara J.. The Turbulent Structure of the Arctic Summer Boundary Layer During The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study. United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD027234.
Brooks, Ian M., Tjernström, Michael, Persson, P. Ola G., Shupe, Matthew D., Atkinson, Rebecca A., Canut, Guylaine, Birch, Cathryn E., Mauritsen, Thorsten, Sedlar, Joseph, and Brooks, Barbara J.. 2017. "The Turbulent Structure of the Arctic Summer Boundary Layer During The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study". United States. doi:10.1002/2017JD027234.
@article{osti_1395400,
title = {The Turbulent Structure of the Arctic Summer Boundary Layer During The Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study},
author = {Brooks, Ian M. and Tjernström, Michael and Persson, P. Ola G. and Shupe, Matthew D. and Atkinson, Rebecca A. and Canut, Guylaine and Birch, Cathryn E. and Mauritsen, Thorsten and Sedlar, Joseph and Brooks, Barbara J.},
abstractNote = {The mostly ice covered Arctic Ocean is dominated by low-level liquid- or mixed-phase clouds.Turbulence within stratocumulus is primarily driven by cloud top cooling that induces convective instability. Using a suite of in situ and remote sensing instruments we characterize turbulent mixing in Arctic stratocumulus, and for the first time we estimate profiles of the gradient Richardson number at relatively high resolution in both time (10 min) and altitude (10 m). It is found that the mixing occurs both within the cloud,as expected, and by wind shear instability near the surface. About 75% of the time these two layers are separated by a stably stratified inversion at 100–200 m altitude. Exceptions are associated with low cloud bases that allow the cloud-driven turbulence to reach the surface. Lastly, the results imply that turbulent coupling between the surface and the cloud is sporadic or intermittent.},
doi = {10.1002/2017JD027234},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres},
number = 18,
volume = 122,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}