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Title: Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures

Abstract

3D printing of materials with active functional groups can provide custom-designed structures that promote chemical conversions. Catalytically active architectures were produced by photopolymerizing bifunctional molecules using a commercial stereolithographic 3D printer. Functionalities in the monomers included a polymerizable vinyl group to assemble the 3D structures and a secondary group to provide them with active sites. The 3D-printed architectures containing accessible carboxylic acid, amine, and copper carboxylate functionalities were catalytically active for the Mannich, aldol, and Huisgen cycloaddition reactions, respectively. The functional groups in the 3D-printed structures were also amenable to post-printing chemical modification. And as proof of principle, chemically active cuvette adaptors were 3D printed and used to measure in situ the kinetics of a heterogeneously catalyzed Mannich reaction in a conventional solution spectrophotometer. In addition, 3D-printed millifluidic devices with catalytically active copper carboxylate complexes were used to promote azide-alkyne cycloaddition under flow conditions. The importance of controlling the 3D architecture of the millifluidic devices was evidenced by enhancing reaction conversion upon increasing the complexity of the 3D prints.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1394818
Report Number(s):
IS-J-9450
Journal ID: ISSN 2155-5435
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Catalysis
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2155-5435
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 3D printing; additive manufacturing; catalysis; polymeric materials; millifluidics

Citation Formats

Manzano, J. Sebastian, Weinstein, Zachary B., Sadow, Aaron D., and Slowing, Igor I. Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b02111.
Manzano, J. Sebastian, Weinstein, Zachary B., Sadow, Aaron D., & Slowing, Igor I. Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures. United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b02111.
Manzano, J. Sebastian, Weinstein, Zachary B., Sadow, Aaron D., and Slowing, Igor I. Fri . "Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures". United States. doi:10.1021/acscatal.7b02111. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394818.
@article{osti_1394818,
title = {Direct 3D Printing of Catalytically Active Structures},
author = {Manzano, J. Sebastian and Weinstein, Zachary B. and Sadow, Aaron D. and Slowing, Igor I.},
abstractNote = {3D printing of materials with active functional groups can provide custom-designed structures that promote chemical conversions. Catalytically active architectures were produced by photopolymerizing bifunctional molecules using a commercial stereolithographic 3D printer. Functionalities in the monomers included a polymerizable vinyl group to assemble the 3D structures and a secondary group to provide them with active sites. The 3D-printed architectures containing accessible carboxylic acid, amine, and copper carboxylate functionalities were catalytically active for the Mannich, aldol, and Huisgen cycloaddition reactions, respectively. The functional groups in the 3D-printed structures were also amenable to post-printing chemical modification. And as proof of principle, chemically active cuvette adaptors were 3D printed and used to measure in situ the kinetics of a heterogeneously catalyzed Mannich reaction in a conventional solution spectrophotometer. In addition, 3D-printed millifluidic devices with catalytically active copper carboxylate complexes were used to promote azide-alkyne cycloaddition under flow conditions. The importance of controlling the 3D architecture of the millifluidic devices was evidenced by enhancing reaction conversion upon increasing the complexity of the 3D prints.},
doi = {10.1021/acscatal.7b02111},
journal = {ACS Catalysis},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}

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Works referencing / citing this record:

Fused deposition processing polycaprolactone of composites for biomedical applications
journal, January 2019

  • Prasad, Arya; Kandasubramanian, Balasubramanian
  • Polymer-Plastics Technology and Materials, Vol. 58, Issue 13
  • DOI: 10.1080/25740881.2018.1563117

Fused deposition processing polycaprolactone of composites for biomedical applications
journal, January 2019

  • Prasad, Arya; Kandasubramanian, Balasubramanian
  • Polymer-Plastics Technology and Materials, Vol. 58, Issue 13
  • DOI: 10.1080/25740881.2018.1563117