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Title: Analytic study of the conditions required for longitudinal stability of dual-wing aircraft

Abstract

Recent studies of new, fuel-efficient transport aircraft have considered designs, which make use of two principal lifting surfaces to provide the required lift as well as trim and static stability. Such designs include open tandem-wings as well as closed joined and box-wings. As a group, these aircraft can be termed dual-wing designs. Our study developed a new analytic model, which takes into account the downwash from the two main wings and is sensitive to three important design variables: the relative areas of each wing, the streamwise separation of the wings, and the center of gravity position. This model was used to better understand trends in the dual-wing geometry on the stability, maneuverability, and lift-to-drag ratio of the aircraft. Dual-wing aircraft have been shown to have reduced the induced drag compared to the conventional designs. In addition, further drag reductions can be realized as the horizontal tail can be removed if the dual-wings have sufficient streamwise stagger to provide the moments necessary for trim and longitudinal stability. As both wings in a dual-wing system carry a significant fraction of the total lift, trends in such designs that led to longitudinal stability can differ from those of the conventional aircraft and havemore » not been the subject of detailed investigation. Results from the analytic model showed that the longitudinal stability required either a reduction of the fore wing area or shifting the center of gravity forward from the midpoint of both wings' aerodynamic centers. Additionally, for wing configurations of approximately equal fore and aft wing areas, increasing the separation between the two wings decreased the stability of the aircraft. The source of this unusual behavior was the asymmetric distribution of downwash upstream and downstream of the wing. These relationships between dual-wing geometry and stability will provide initial guidance on the conceptual design of dual-wing aircraft and aid in the understanding of the results of more complex studies of such designs, furthering the development of future transport aircraft.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Verification and Analysis Group (XCP-8); Royal Miltary College, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  2. Royal Miltary College, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1392873
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-29202
Journal ID: ISSN 0954-4100
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G, Journal of Aerospace Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 232; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0954-4100
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 42 ENGINEERING; unconventional aircraft; stability and control; aerodynamics; dual-wing; nonplanar wing

Citation Formats

Andrews, Stephen Arthur, and Perez, Ruben E. Analytic study of the conditions required for longitudinal stability of dual-wing aircraft. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1177/0954410017704215.
Andrews, Stephen Arthur, & Perez, Ruben E. Analytic study of the conditions required for longitudinal stability of dual-wing aircraft. United States. doi:10.1177/0954410017704215.
Andrews, Stephen Arthur, and Perez, Ruben E. Thu . "Analytic study of the conditions required for longitudinal stability of dual-wing aircraft". United States. doi:10.1177/0954410017704215. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1392873.
@article{osti_1392873,
title = {Analytic study of the conditions required for longitudinal stability of dual-wing aircraft},
author = {Andrews, Stephen Arthur and Perez, Ruben E.},
abstractNote = {Recent studies of new, fuel-efficient transport aircraft have considered designs, which make use of two principal lifting surfaces to provide the required lift as well as trim and static stability. Such designs include open tandem-wings as well as closed joined and box-wings. As a group, these aircraft can be termed dual-wing designs. Our study developed a new analytic model, which takes into account the downwash from the two main wings and is sensitive to three important design variables: the relative areas of each wing, the streamwise separation of the wings, and the center of gravity position. This model was used to better understand trends in the dual-wing geometry on the stability, maneuverability, and lift-to-drag ratio of the aircraft. Dual-wing aircraft have been shown to have reduced the induced drag compared to the conventional designs. In addition, further drag reductions can be realized as the horizontal tail can be removed if the dual-wings have sufficient streamwise stagger to provide the moments necessary for trim and longitudinal stability. As both wings in a dual-wing system carry a significant fraction of the total lift, trends in such designs that led to longitudinal stability can differ from those of the conventional aircraft and have not been the subject of detailed investigation. Results from the analytic model showed that the longitudinal stability required either a reduction of the fore wing area or shifting the center of gravity forward from the midpoint of both wings' aerodynamic centers. Additionally, for wing configurations of approximately equal fore and aft wing areas, increasing the separation between the two wings decreased the stability of the aircraft. The source of this unusual behavior was the asymmetric distribution of downwash upstream and downstream of the wing. These relationships between dual-wing geometry and stability will provide initial guidance on the conceptual design of dual-wing aircraft and aid in the understanding of the results of more complex studies of such designs, furthering the development of future transport aircraft.},
doi = {10.1177/0954410017704215},
journal = {Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part G, Journal of Aerospace Engineering},
number = 5,
volume = 232,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}

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