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Title: Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil

The utilization of advanced biofuels in stationary applications, such as home heating, is considered as an early entry point for biomass-derived fuels into the distillate fuel market sector. Two renewable fuels produced by a biomass fluidized catalytic cracking (BFCC) process, followed by hydroprocessing and fractionation, were tested. The evaluation was performed on a pure (100%) distillate fraction, 50% blend of the distillate fraction with petroleum-based heating oil, and 20% blend of a heavier gas oil fraction. Combustion experiments were carried out in a transparent quartz chamber and a typical oil-fired residential boiler. The flame stability, size, and shape produced by the fuels were examined. The flue gas was analyzed for O 2, CO, NO x, and smoke. The elastomer compatibility test was performed with nitrile slabs at 43 °C for 1 month. Fuel stability was examined at 80 °C for 1 week. The results from the combustion studies suggest that the distillate fuel blends could be used as alternative fuels to No. 2 heating oil, even up to 100% without any operational issues. The distillate fuels were found to be stable. and the nitrile slab volume swell (~10%) suggests that the fuel could be compatible to legacy elastomers.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  3. KiOR, Inc., Pasadena, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
BNL-114132-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0887-0624
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy and Fuels
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0887-0624
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Research Org:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies Office (EE-3F)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS
OSTI Identifier:
1389225

Mante, Ofei D., Butcher, Thomas A., Wei, George, Trojanowski, Rebecca, and Sanchez, Vicente. Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01751.
Mante, Ofei D., Butcher, Thomas A., Wei, George, Trojanowski, Rebecca, & Sanchez, Vicente. Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01751.
Mante, Ofei D., Butcher, Thomas A., Wei, George, Trojanowski, Rebecca, and Sanchez, Vicente. 2015. "Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01751. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389225.
@article{osti_1389225,
title = {Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil},
author = {Mante, Ofei D. and Butcher, Thomas A. and Wei, George and Trojanowski, Rebecca and Sanchez, Vicente},
abstractNote = {The utilization of advanced biofuels in stationary applications, such as home heating, is considered as an early entry point for biomass-derived fuels into the distillate fuel market sector. Two renewable fuels produced by a biomass fluidized catalytic cracking (BFCC) process, followed by hydroprocessing and fractionation, were tested. The evaluation was performed on a pure (100%) distillate fraction, 50% blend of the distillate fraction with petroleum-based heating oil, and 20% blend of a heavier gas oil fraction. Combustion experiments were carried out in a transparent quartz chamber and a typical oil-fired residential boiler. The flame stability, size, and shape produced by the fuels were examined. The flue gas was analyzed for O2, CO, NOx, and smoke. The elastomer compatibility test was performed with nitrile slabs at 43 °C for 1 month. Fuel stability was examined at 80 °C for 1 week. The results from the combustion studies suggest that the distillate fuel blends could be used as alternative fuels to No. 2 heating oil, even up to 100% without any operational issues. The distillate fuels were found to be stable. and the nitrile slab volume swell (~10%) suggests that the fuel could be compatible to legacy elastomers.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.energyfuels.5b01751},
journal = {Energy and Fuels},
number = 10,
volume = 29,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {9}
}