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Title: Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy

Feynman once asked physicists to build better electron microscopes to be able to watch biology at work. While electron microscopes can now provide atomic resolution, electron beam induced specimen damage precludes high resolution imaging of sensitive materials, such as single proteins or polymers. Here, we use simulations to show that an electron microscope based on a multi-pass measurement protocol enables imaging of single proteins, without averaging structures over multiple images. While we demonstrate the method for particular imaging targets, the approach is broadly applicable and is expected to improve resolution and sensitivity for a range of electron microscopy imaging modalities, including, for example, scanning and spectroscopic techniques. The approach implements a quantum mechanically optimal strategy which under idealized conditions can be considered interaction-free.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Physics Dept.
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Center for Electron Microscopy
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrative Bioimaging
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; cryoelectron microscopy; quantum metrology; transmission electron microscopy
OSTI Identifier:
1379931

Juffmann, Thomas, Koppell, Stewart A., Klopfer, Brannon B., Ophus, Colin, Glaeser, Robert M., and Kasevich, Mark A.. Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-01841-x.
Juffmann, Thomas, Koppell, Stewart A., Klopfer, Brannon B., Ophus, Colin, Glaeser, Robert M., & Kasevich, Mark A.. Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-01841-x.
Juffmann, Thomas, Koppell, Stewart A., Klopfer, Brannon B., Ophus, Colin, Glaeser, Robert M., and Kasevich, Mark A.. 2017. "Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-01841-x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379931.
@article{osti_1379931,
title = {Multi-pass transmission electron microscopy},
author = {Juffmann, Thomas and Koppell, Stewart A. and Klopfer, Brannon B. and Ophus, Colin and Glaeser, Robert M. and Kasevich, Mark A.},
abstractNote = {Feynman once asked physicists to build better electron microscopes to be able to watch biology at work. While electron microscopes can now provide atomic resolution, electron beam induced specimen damage precludes high resolution imaging of sensitive materials, such as single proteins or polymers. Here, we use simulations to show that an electron microscope based on a multi-pass measurement protocol enables imaging of single proteins, without averaging structures over multiple images. While we demonstrate the method for particular imaging targets, the approach is broadly applicable and is expected to improve resolution and sensitivity for a range of electron microscopy imaging modalities, including, for example, scanning and spectroscopic techniques. The approach implements a quantum mechanically optimal strategy which under idealized conditions can be considered interaction-free.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-01841-x},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Electric Field Effect in Atomically Thin Carbon Films
journal, October 2004