skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition

Climate model projections for tropical regions show clear perturbation of precipitation patterns leading to increased frequency and severity of drought in some regions. Previous work has shown declining soil moisture to be a strong driver of changes in microbial trait distribution, however, the feedback of any shift in functional potential on ecosystem properties related to carbon cycling are poorly understood. Here we show that drought-induced changes in microbial functional diversity and activity shape, and are in turn shaped by, the composition of dissolved and soil-associated carbon. We also demonstrate that a shift in microbial functional traits that favor the production of hygroscopic compounds alter the efflux of carbon dioxide following soil rewetting. Under drought the composition of the dissolved organic carbon pool changed in a manner consistent with a microbial metabolic response. We hypothesize that this microbial ecophysiological response to changing soil moisture elevates the intracellular carbon demand stimulating extracellular enzyme production, that prompts the observed decline in more complex carbon compounds (e.g., cellulose and lignin). Furthermore, a metabolic response to drought appeared to condition (biologically and physically) the soil, notably through the production of polysaccharides, particularly in experimental plots that had been pre-exposed to a short-term drought. This hystereticmore » response, in addition to an observed drought-related decline in phosphorus concentration, may have been responsible for a comparatively modest CO 2 efflux following wet-up in drought plots relative to control plots.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [3] ;  [5]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Climate and Ecosystem Sciences, Earth and Environmental Sciences
  2. US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service, Rio Piedras, PR (United States); Puerto Rican Foundation of Conservation, San Juan, PR (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Genomics and Systems Biology
  4. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science
  5. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Climate and Ecosystem Sciences, Earth and Environmental Sciences; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: MAR; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; tropical forest; drought; microbial functions; carbon dioxide; soil carbon
OSTI Identifier:
1379159

Bouskill, Nicholas J., Wood, Tana E., Baran, Richard, Hao, Zhao, Ye, Zaw, Bowen, Ben P., Lim, Hsiao Chien, Nico, Peter S., Holman, Hoi-Ying, Gilbert, Benjamin, Silver, Whendee L., Northen, Trent R., and Brodie, Eoin L.. Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00323.
Bouskill, Nicholas J., Wood, Tana E., Baran, Richard, Hao, Zhao, Ye, Zaw, Bowen, Ben P., Lim, Hsiao Chien, Nico, Peter S., Holman, Hoi-Ying, Gilbert, Benjamin, Silver, Whendee L., Northen, Trent R., & Brodie, Eoin L.. Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00323.
Bouskill, Nicholas J., Wood, Tana E., Baran, Richard, Hao, Zhao, Ye, Zaw, Bowen, Ben P., Lim, Hsiao Chien, Nico, Peter S., Holman, Hoi-Ying, Gilbert, Benjamin, Silver, Whendee L., Northen, Trent R., and Brodie, Eoin L.. 2016. "Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.00323. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1379159.
@article{osti_1379159,
title = {Belowground Response to Drought in a Tropical Forest Soil. II. Change in Microbial Function Impacts Carbon Composition},
author = {Bouskill, Nicholas J. and Wood, Tana E. and Baran, Richard and Hao, Zhao and Ye, Zaw and Bowen, Ben P. and Lim, Hsiao Chien and Nico, Peter S. and Holman, Hoi-Ying and Gilbert, Benjamin and Silver, Whendee L. and Northen, Trent R. and Brodie, Eoin L.},
abstractNote = {Climate model projections for tropical regions show clear perturbation of precipitation patterns leading to increased frequency and severity of drought in some regions. Previous work has shown declining soil moisture to be a strong driver of changes in microbial trait distribution, however, the feedback of any shift in functional potential on ecosystem properties related to carbon cycling are poorly understood. Here we show that drought-induced changes in microbial functional diversity and activity shape, and are in turn shaped by, the composition of dissolved and soil-associated carbon. We also demonstrate that a shift in microbial functional traits that favor the production of hygroscopic compounds alter the efflux of carbon dioxide following soil rewetting. Under drought the composition of the dissolved organic carbon pool changed in a manner consistent with a microbial metabolic response. We hypothesize that this microbial ecophysiological response to changing soil moisture elevates the intracellular carbon demand stimulating extracellular enzyme production, that prompts the observed decline in more complex carbon compounds (e.g., cellulose and lignin). Furthermore, a metabolic response to drought appeared to condition (biologically and physically) the soil, notably through the production of polysaccharides, particularly in experimental plots that had been pre-exposed to a short-term drought. This hysteretic response, in addition to an observed drought-related decline in phosphorus concentration, may have been responsible for a comparatively modest CO 2 efflux following wet-up in drought plots relative to control plots.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2016.00323},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = MAR,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {3}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Structural Systems Biology Evaluation of Metabolic Thermotolerance in Escherichia coli
journal, June 2013