skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Constraints on methane emissions in North America from future geostationary remote-sensing measurements

Abstract

The success of future geostationary (GEO) satellite observation missions depends on our ability to design instruments that address their key scientific objectives. Here, an Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is performed to quantify the constraints on methane (CH4) emissions in North America obtained from shortwave infrared (SWIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and multi-spectral (SWIR+TIR) measurements in geostationary orbit and from future SWIR low-Earth orbit (LEO) measurements. Furthermore, we used an efficient stochastic algorithm to compute the information content of the inverted emissions at high spatial resolution (0.5° × 0.7°) in a variational framework using the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model and its adjoint. Our results show that at sub-weekly timescales, SWIR measurements in GEO orbit can constrain about twice as many independent flux patterns than in LEO orbit, with a degree of freedom for signal (DOF) for the inversion of 266 and 115, respectively. Comparisons between TIR GEO and SWIR LEO configurations reveal that poor boundary layer sensitivities for the TIR measurements cannot be compensated for by the high spatiotemporal sampling of a GEO orbit. The benefit of a multi-spectral instrument compared to current SWIR products in a GEO context is shown for sub-weekly timescale constraints, with an increase in the DOF ofmore » about 50 % for a 3-day inversion. Our results further suggest that both the SWIR and multi-spectral measurements on GEO orbits could almost fully resolve CH4 fluxes at a spatial resolution of at least 100 km × 100 km over source hotspots (emissions > 4 × 105 kg day-1). The sensitivity of the optimized emission scaling factors to typical errors in boundary and initial conditions can reach 30 and 50 % for the SWIR GEO or SWIR LEO configurations, respectively, while it is smaller than 5 % in the case of a multi-spectral GEO system. Our results demonstrate that multi-spectral measurements from a geostationary satellite platform would address the need for higher spatiotemporal constraints on CH4 emissions while greatly mitigating the impact of inherent uncertainties in source inversion methods on the inferred fluxes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  2. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  3. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF); National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1375408
Grant/Contract Number:  
NNX14AH02G; NA14OAR4310136; CNS-0821794
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Bousserez, Nicolas, Henze, Daven K., Rooney, Brigitte, Perkins, Andre, Wecht, Kevin J., Turner, Alexander J., Natraj, Vijay, and Worden, John R. Constraints on methane emissions in North America from future geostationary remote-sensing measurements. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-16-6175-2016.
Bousserez, Nicolas, Henze, Daven K., Rooney, Brigitte, Perkins, Andre, Wecht, Kevin J., Turner, Alexander J., Natraj, Vijay, & Worden, John R. Constraints on methane emissions in North America from future geostationary remote-sensing measurements. United States. doi:10.5194/acp-16-6175-2016.
Bousserez, Nicolas, Henze, Daven K., Rooney, Brigitte, Perkins, Andre, Wecht, Kevin J., Turner, Alexander J., Natraj, Vijay, and Worden, John R. Fri . "Constraints on methane emissions in North America from future geostationary remote-sensing measurements". United States. doi:10.5194/acp-16-6175-2016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375408.
@article{osti_1375408,
title = {Constraints on methane emissions in North America from future geostationary remote-sensing measurements},
author = {Bousserez, Nicolas and Henze, Daven K. and Rooney, Brigitte and Perkins, Andre and Wecht, Kevin J. and Turner, Alexander J. and Natraj, Vijay and Worden, John R.},
abstractNote = {The success of future geostationary (GEO) satellite observation missions depends on our ability to design instruments that address their key scientific objectives. Here, an Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is performed to quantify the constraints on methane (CH4) emissions in North America obtained from shortwave infrared (SWIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and multi-spectral (SWIR+TIR) measurements in geostationary orbit and from future SWIR low-Earth orbit (LEO) measurements. Furthermore, we used an efficient stochastic algorithm to compute the information content of the inverted emissions at high spatial resolution (0.5° × 0.7°) in a variational framework using the GEOS-Chem chemistry-transport model and its adjoint. Our results show that at sub-weekly timescales, SWIR measurements in GEO orbit can constrain about twice as many independent flux patterns than in LEO orbit, with a degree of freedom for signal (DOF) for the inversion of 266 and 115, respectively. Comparisons between TIR GEO and SWIR LEO configurations reveal that poor boundary layer sensitivities for the TIR measurements cannot be compensated for by the high spatiotemporal sampling of a GEO orbit. The benefit of a multi-spectral instrument compared to current SWIR products in a GEO context is shown for sub-weekly timescale constraints, with an increase in the DOF of about 50 % for a 3-day inversion. Our results further suggest that both the SWIR and multi-spectral measurements on GEO orbits could almost fully resolve CH4 fluxes at a spatial resolution of at least 100 km × 100 km over source hotspots (emissions > 4 × 105 kg day-1). The sensitivity of the optimized emission scaling factors to typical errors in boundary and initial conditions can reach 30 and 50 % for the SWIR GEO or SWIR LEO configurations, respectively, while it is smaller than 5 % in the case of a multi-spectral GEO system. Our results demonstrate that multi-spectral measurements from a geostationary satellite platform would address the need for higher spatiotemporal constraints on CH4 emissions while greatly mitigating the impact of inherent uncertainties in source inversion methods on the inferred fluxes.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-16-6175-2016},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
number = 10,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 9 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Global CO 2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total column CO 2
journal, January 2013


Seasonal variability of tropical wetland CH 4 emissions: the role of the methanogen-available carbon pool
journal, January 2012


Bayesian design of control space for optimal assimilation of observations. Part I: Consistent multiscale formalism
journal, May 2011

  • Bocquet, M.; Wu, L.; Chevallier, F.
  • Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, Vol. 137, Issue 658
  • DOI: 10.1002/qj.837

Improved analysis-error covariance matrix for high-dimensional variational inversions: application to source estimation using a 3D atmospheric transport model: Improved Analysis-Error Covariance Estimates
journal, January 2015

  • Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.; Perkins, A.
  • Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, Vol. 141, Issue 690
  • DOI: 10.1002/qj.2495

CH 4 retrievals from space-based solar backscatter measurements: Performance evaluation against simulated aerosol and cirrus loaded scenes : EVALUATION OF CH
journal, December 2010

  • Butz, A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Frankenberg, C.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 115, Issue D24
  • DOI: 10.1029/2010JD014514

Toward a better understanding and quantification of methane emissions from shale gas development
journal, April 2014

  • Caulton, D. R.; Shepson, P. B.; Santoro, R. L.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 111, Issue 17
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1316546111

Tropospheric emissions: monitoring of pollution (TEMPO)
conference, September 2013

  • Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.
  • SPIE Optical Engineering + Applications, SPIE Proceedings
  • DOI: 10.1117/12.2024479

Contribution of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory to the estimation of CO 2 sources and sinks: Theoretical study in a variational data assimilation framework
journal, January 2007

  • Chevallier, Frédéric; Bréon, François-Marie; Rayner, Peter J.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 112, Issue D9
  • DOI: 10.1029/2006JD007375

Orbiting Carbon Observatory: Inverse method and prospective error analysis: OCO INVERSE METHOD
journal, March 2008

  • Connor, Brian J.; Boesch, Hartmut; Toon, Geoffrey
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 113, Issue D5
  • DOI: 10.1029/2006JD008336

On the consistency between global and regional methane emissions inferred from SCIAMACHY, TANSO-FTS, IASI and surface measurements
journal, January 2014

  • Cressot, C.; Chevallier, F.; Bousquet, P.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 14, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-14-577-2014

Inferring regional sources and sinks of atmospheric CO 2 from GOSAT XCO 2 data
journal, January 2014

  • Deng, F.; Jones, D. B. A.; Henze, D. K.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 14, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-14-3703-2014

Global atmospheric methane: budget, changes and dangers
journal, May 2011

  • Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Nisbet, Euan G.; Fisher, Rebecca
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Vol. 369, Issue 1943
  • DOI: 10.1098/rsta.2010.0341

Linking ozone pollution and climate change: The case for controlling methane: LINKING OZONE POLLUTION AND CLIMATE CHANGE
journal, October 2002

  • Fiore, Arlene M.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Field, Brendan D.
  • Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 29, Issue 19
  • DOI: 10.1029/2002GL015601

Characterizing the tropospheric ozone response to methane emission controls and the benefits to climate and air quality
journal, January 2008

  • Fiore, Arlene M.; West, J. Jason; Horowitz, Larry W.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, Issue D8
  • DOI: 10.1029/2007JD009162

The United States' Next Generation of Atmospheric Composition and Coastal Ecosystem Measurements: NASA's Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) Mission
journal, October 2012

  • Fishman, J.; Iraci, L. T.; Al-Saadi, J.
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Vol. 93, Issue 10
  • DOI: 10.1175/BAMS-D-11-00201.1

Characterization of ozone profiles derived from Aura TES and OMI radiances
journal, January 2013


Three-dimensional model synthesis of the global methane cycle
journal, January 1991

  • Fung, I.; John, J.; Lerner, J.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 96, Issue D7
  • DOI: 10.1029/91JD01247

Diurnal dynamics of CH 4 from a boreal peatland during snowmelt
journal, January 2010


Wetlands at the Last Glacial Maximum: Distribution and methane emissions: WETLANDS AT THE LAST GLACIAL MAXIMUM
journal, March 2002


Methane emissions estimate from airborne measurements over a western United States natural gas field: CH
journal, August 2013

  • Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Pétron, Gabrielle
  • Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 40, Issue 16
  • DOI: 10.1002/grl.50811

Extensive regional atmospheric hydrocarbon pollution in the southwestern United States
journal, October 2003

  • Katzenstein, A. S.; Doezema, L. A.; Simpson, I. J.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 100, Issue 21
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1635258100

Three decades of global methane sources and sinks
journal, September 2013

  • Kirschke, Stefanie; Bousquet, Philippe; Ciais, Philippe
  • Nature Geoscience, Vol. 6, Issue 10
  • DOI: 10.1038/ngeo1955

Emissions of CH 4 and N 2 O over the United States and Canada based on a receptor-oriented modeling framework and COBRA-NA atmospheric observations
journal, January 2008

  • Kort, Eric A.; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Stephens, Britton B.
  • Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 35, Issue 18
  • DOI: 10.1029/2008GL034031

Implementation of cloud retrievals for Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) atmospheric retrievals: part 1. Description and characterization of errors on trace gas retrievals
journal, January 2006

  • Kulawik, Susan S.; Worden, John; Eldering, Annmarie
  • Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 111, Issue D24
  • DOI: 10.1029/2005JD006733

Carbon monitoring system flux estimation and attribution: impact of ACOS-GOSAT X CO 2 sampling on the inference of terrestrial biospheric sources and sinks
journal, January 2014

  • Liu, Junjie; Bowman, Kevin W.; Lee, Meemong
  • Tellus B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology, Vol. 66, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.3402/tellusb.v66.22486

Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling
journal, January 2013

  • Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 13, Issue 19
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-13-9917-2013

Four-dimensional variational data assimilation for inverse modelling of atmospheric methane emissions: method and comparison with synthesis inversion
journal, January 2008

  • Meirink, J. F.; Bergamaschi, P.; Krol, M. C.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 8, Issue 21
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-8-6341-2008

Anthropogenic emissions of methane in the United States
journal, November 2013

  • Miller, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Michalak, A. M.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 110, Issue 50
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1314392110

Observational constraints on the distribution, seasonality, and environmental predictors of North American boreal methane emissions
journal, February 2014

  • Miller, Scot M.; Worthy, Doug E. J.; Michalak, Anna M.
  • Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Vol. 28, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1002/2013GB004580

The seasonal and diurnal dynamics of methane flux at a created urban wetland
journal, November 2014


Methane observations from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite: Comparison to ground-based TCCON data and model calculations: GOSAT CH
journal, August 2011

  • Parker, Robert; Boesch, Hartmut; Cogan, Austin
  • Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 38, Issue 15
  • DOI: 10.1029/2011GL047871

Magnitude and seasonality of wetland methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands (Canada)
journal, January 2011

  • Pickett-Heaps, C. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 11, Issue 8
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-11-3773-2011

Performance of a geostationary mission, geoCARB, to measure CO 2 , CH 4 and CO column-averaged concentrations
journal, January 2014

  • Polonsky, I. N.; O'Brien, D. M.; Kumer, J. B.
  • Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, Vol. 7, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.5194/amt-7-959-2014

Constraining regional greenhouse gas emissions using geostationary concentration measurements: a theoretical study
journal, January 2014

  • Rayner, P. J.; Utembe, S. R.; Crowell, S.
  • Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, Vol. 7, Issue 10
  • DOI: 10.5194/amt-7-3285-2014

Simultaneously Mitigating Near-Term Climate Change and Improving Human Health and Food Security
journal, January 2012


Balancing aggregation and smoothing errors in inverse models
journal, January 2015


Estimating global and North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution using GOSAT satellite data
journal, January 2015

  • Turner, A. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wecht, K. J.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 15, Issue 12
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-15-7049-2015

Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997–2009)
journal, January 2010

  • van der Werf, G. R.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 10, Issue 23
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-10-11707-2010

Validation of TES methane with HIPPO aircraft observations: implications for inverse modeling of methane sources
journal, January 2012

  • Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Wofsy, S. C.
  • Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 12, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.5194/acp-12-1823-2012

Mapping of North American methane emissions with high spatial resolution by inversion of SCIAMACHY satellite data: NORTH AMERICA METHANE EMISSION INVERSION
journal, June 2014

  • Wecht, Kevin J.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Frankenberg, Christian
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 119, Issue 12
  • DOI: 10.1002/2014JD021551

Management of Tropospheric Ozone by Reducing Methane Emissions
journal, July 2005

  • West, J. Jason; Fiore, Arlene M.
  • Environmental Science & Technology, Vol. 39, Issue 13
  • DOI: 10.1021/es048629f

Global health benefits of mitigating ozone pollution with methane emission controls
journal, March 2006

  • West, J. J.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 103, Issue 11
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0600201103

Scenarios of methane emission reductions to 2030: abatement costs and co-benefits to ozone air quality and human mortality
journal, March 2012


Predicted errors of tropospheric emission spectrometer nadir retrievals from spectral window selection
journal, January 2004


Profiles of CH 4 , HDO, H 2 O, and N 2 O with improved lower tropospheric vertical resolution from Aura TES radiances
journal, January 2012

  • Worden, J.; Kulawik, S.; Frankenberg, C.
  • Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, Vol. 5, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.5194/amt-5-397-2012

Quantifying lower tropospheric methane concentrations using GOSAT near-IR and TES thermal IR measurements
journal, January 2015

  • Worden, J. R.; Turner, A. J.; Bloom, A.
  • Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, Vol. 8, Issue 8
  • DOI: 10.5194/amt-8-3433-2015

Global budget of ethane and regional constraints on U.S. sources
journal, January 2008

  • Xiao, Yaping; Logan, Jennifer A.; Jacob, Daniel J.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, Issue D21
  • DOI: 10.1029/2007JD009415

An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world
journal, October 2003

  • Yevich, Rosemarie; Logan, Jennifer A.
  • Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Vol. 17, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1029/2002GB001952

Sources and Impacts of Atmospheric NH3: Current Understanding and Frontiers for Modeling, Measurements, and Remote Sensing in North America
journal, June 2015


    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Constraining sector-specific CO 2 and CH 4 emissions in the US
    journal, January 2017


    Constraining sector-specific CO 2 and CH 4 emissions in the US
    journal, January 2017