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Title: Maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of triclocarban results in perinatal exposure and potential alterations in offspring development in the mouse model

Triclocarban (TCC) is among the top 10 most commonly detected wastewater contaminants in both concentration and frequency. Its presence in water, as well as its propensity to bioaccumulate, has raised numerous questions about potential endocrine and developmental effects. Here in this paper, we investigated whether exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration of TCC could result in transfer from mother to offspring in CD-1 mice during gestation and lactation using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 14C-TCC (100 nM) was administered to dams through drinking water up to gestation day 18, or from birth to post-natal day 10. AMS was used to quantify 14C-concentrations in offspring and dams after exposure. We demonstrated that TCC does effectively transfer from mother to offspring, both trans-placentally and via lactation. TCC-related compounds were detected in the tissues of offspring with significantly higher concentrations in the brain, heart and fat. In addition to transfer from mother to offspring, exposed offspring were heavier in weight than unexposed controls demonstrating an 11% and 8.5% increase in body weight for females and males, respectively. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to examine changes in gene expression in liver and adipose tissue in exposed offspring. qPCR suggested alterations in genesmore » involved in lipid metabolism in exposed female offspring, which was consistent with the observed increased fat pad weights and hepatic triglycerides. This study represents the first report to quantify the transfer of an environmentally relevant concentration of TCC from mother to offspring in the mouse model and evaluate bio-distribution after exposure using AMS. Our findings suggest that early-life exposure to TCC may interfere with lipid metabolism and could have implications for human health.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Biosciences and Biotechnology Division
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Accelerator Mass Spectromet
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Data Analytics and Decision Sciences
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; 11-LW-018
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; lactation; Water resources; Fats; Body weight; Lipid metabolism; Gene expression; Heart; Chemical disruption
OSTI Identifier:
1374484
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1395313

Enright, Heather A., Falso, Miranda J. S., Malfatti, Michael A., Lao, Victoria, Kuhn, Edward A., Hum, Nicholas, Shi, Yilan, Sales, Ana Paula, Haack, Kurt W., Kulp, Kristen S., Buchholz, Bruce A., Loots, Gabriela G., Bench, Graham, and Turteltaub, Kenneth W.. Maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of triclocarban results in perinatal exposure and potential alterations in offspring development in the mouse model. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181996.
Enright, Heather A., Falso, Miranda J. S., Malfatti, Michael A., Lao, Victoria, Kuhn, Edward A., Hum, Nicholas, Shi, Yilan, Sales, Ana Paula, Haack, Kurt W., Kulp, Kristen S., Buchholz, Bruce A., Loots, Gabriela G., Bench, Graham, & Turteltaub, Kenneth W.. Maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of triclocarban results in perinatal exposure and potential alterations in offspring development in the mouse model. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181996.
Enright, Heather A., Falso, Miranda J. S., Malfatti, Michael A., Lao, Victoria, Kuhn, Edward A., Hum, Nicholas, Shi, Yilan, Sales, Ana Paula, Haack, Kurt W., Kulp, Kristen S., Buchholz, Bruce A., Loots, Gabriela G., Bench, Graham, and Turteltaub, Kenneth W.. 2017. "Maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of triclocarban results in perinatal exposure and potential alterations in offspring development in the mouse model". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181996.
@article{osti_1374484,
title = {Maternal exposure to an environmentally relevant dose of triclocarban results in perinatal exposure and potential alterations in offspring development in the mouse model},
author = {Enright, Heather A. and Falso, Miranda J. S. and Malfatti, Michael A. and Lao, Victoria and Kuhn, Edward A. and Hum, Nicholas and Shi, Yilan and Sales, Ana Paula and Haack, Kurt W. and Kulp, Kristen S. and Buchholz, Bruce A. and Loots, Gabriela G. and Bench, Graham and Turteltaub, Kenneth W.},
abstractNote = {Triclocarban (TCC) is among the top 10 most commonly detected wastewater contaminants in both concentration and frequency. Its presence in water, as well as its propensity to bioaccumulate, has raised numerous questions about potential endocrine and developmental effects. Here in this paper, we investigated whether exposure to an environmentally relevant concentration of TCC could result in transfer from mother to offspring in CD-1 mice during gestation and lactation using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 14C-TCC (100 nM) was administered to dams through drinking water up to gestation day 18, or from birth to post-natal day 10. AMS was used to quantify 14C-concentrations in offspring and dams after exposure. We demonstrated that TCC does effectively transfer from mother to offspring, both trans-placentally and via lactation. TCC-related compounds were detected in the tissues of offspring with significantly higher concentrations in the brain, heart and fat. In addition to transfer from mother to offspring, exposed offspring were heavier in weight than unexposed controls demonstrating an 11% and 8.5% increase in body weight for females and males, respectively. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to examine changes in gene expression in liver and adipose tissue in exposed offspring. qPCR suggested alterations in genes involved in lipid metabolism in exposed female offspring, which was consistent with the observed increased fat pad weights and hepatic triglycerides. This study represents the first report to quantify the transfer of an environmentally relevant concentration of TCC from mother to offspring in the mouse model and evaluate bio-distribution after exposure using AMS. Our findings suggest that early-life exposure to TCC may interfere with lipid metabolism and could have implications for human health.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0181996},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 8,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}