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Title: Perspective: Advanced particle imaging

This study discuss, the first ion imaging experiment demonstrating the capability of collecting an image of the photofragments from a unimolecular dissociation event and analyzing that image to obtain the three-dimensional velocity distribution of the fragments, the efficacy and breadth of application of the ion imaging technique have continued to improve and grow. With the addition of velocity mapping, ion/electron centroiding, and slice imaging techniques, the versatility and velocity resolution have been unmatched. Recent improvements in molecular beam, laser, sensor, and computer technology are allowing even more advanced particle imaging experiments, and eventually we can expect multi-mass imaging with co-variance and full coincidence capability on a single shot basis with repetition rates in the kilohertz range. This progress should further enable “complete” experiments—the holy grail of molecular dynamics—where all quantum numbers of reactants and products of a bimolecular scattering event are fully determined and even under our control.
Authors:
 [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  3. Radboud Univ. of Nijmegen, Nijmegen (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-2410J
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606; JCPSA6; 651469
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; KC0301020
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 147; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS
OSTI Identifier:
1371480
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1361897

Chandler, David W., Houston, Paul L., and Parker, David H.. Perspective: Advanced particle imaging. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.4983623.
Chandler, David W., Houston, Paul L., & Parker, David H.. Perspective: Advanced particle imaging. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4983623.
Chandler, David W., Houston, Paul L., and Parker, David H.. 2017. "Perspective: Advanced particle imaging". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4983623. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1371480.
@article{osti_1371480,
title = {Perspective: Advanced particle imaging},
author = {Chandler, David W. and Houston, Paul L. and Parker, David H.},
abstractNote = {This study discuss, the first ion imaging experiment demonstrating the capability of collecting an image of the photofragments from a unimolecular dissociation event and analyzing that image to obtain the three-dimensional velocity distribution of the fragments, the efficacy and breadth of application of the ion imaging technique have continued to improve and grow. With the addition of velocity mapping, ion/electron centroiding, and slice imaging techniques, the versatility and velocity resolution have been unmatched. Recent improvements in molecular beam, laser, sensor, and computer technology are allowing even more advanced particle imaging experiments, and eventually we can expect multi-mass imaging with co-variance and full coincidence capability on a single shot basis with repetition rates in the kilohertz range. This progress should further enable “complete” experiments—the holy grail of molecular dynamics—where all quantum numbers of reactants and products of a bimolecular scattering event are fully determined and even under our control.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4983623},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 1,
volume = 147,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}