skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Concentrating Solar Power

Abstract

Solar energy is a bountiful renewable energy resource: the energy in the sunlight that reaches Earth in an hour exceeds the energy consumed by all of humanity in a year.(1) While the phrase “solar energy conversion” probably brings photovoltaic (PV) cells to mind first, PV is not the only option for generating electricity from sunlight. Another promising technology for solar energy conversion is solar–thermal conversion, commonly referred to as concentrating solar power (CSP).(2) The first utility-scale CSP plants were constructed in the 1980s, but in the two decades that followed, CSP saw little expansion.(3, 4) More recent years, however, have seen a CSP renaissance due to unprecedented growth in the adoption of CSP.(3, 5) Photographs of two operating CSP plants, a parabolic trough collector plant and a central receiver (or “power tower”), are shown here.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1370973
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0001299; FG02-09ER46577
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemical Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: 23; Related Information: S3TEC partners with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (lead); Boston College; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2665
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; solar (photovoltaic), solar (thermal), solid state lighting, phonons, thermal conductivity, thermoelectric, defects, mechanical behavior, charge transport, spin dynamics, materials and chemistry by design, optics, synthesis (novel materials), synthesis (self-assembly), synthesis (scalable processing)

Citation Formats

Weinstein, Lee A., Loomis, James, Bhatia, Bikram, Bierman, David M., Wang, Evelyn N., and Chen, Gang. Concentrating Solar Power. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.5b00397.
Weinstein, Lee A., Loomis, James, Bhatia, Bikram, Bierman, David M., Wang, Evelyn N., & Chen, Gang. Concentrating Solar Power. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.5b00397.
Weinstein, Lee A., Loomis, James, Bhatia, Bikram, Bierman, David M., Wang, Evelyn N., and Chen, Gang. Wed . "Concentrating Solar Power". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.5b00397. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1370973.
@article{osti_1370973,
title = {Concentrating Solar Power},
author = {Weinstein, Lee A. and Loomis, James and Bhatia, Bikram and Bierman, David M. and Wang, Evelyn N. and Chen, Gang},
abstractNote = {Solar energy is a bountiful renewable energy resource: the energy in the sunlight that reaches Earth in an hour exceeds the energy consumed by all of humanity in a year.(1) While the phrase “solar energy conversion” probably brings photovoltaic (PV) cells to mind first, PV is not the only option for generating electricity from sunlight. Another promising technology for solar energy conversion is solar–thermal conversion, commonly referred to as concentrating solar power (CSP).(2) The first utility-scale CSP plants were constructed in the 1980s, but in the two decades that followed, CSP saw little expansion.(3, 4) More recent years, however, have seen a CSP renaissance due to unprecedented growth in the adoption of CSP.(3, 5) Photographs of two operating CSP plants, a parabolic trough collector plant and a central receiver (or “power tower”), are shown here.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.chemrev.5b00397},
journal = {Chemical Reviews},
number = 23,
volume = 115,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 40 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: