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Title: Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV

High-speed, time-resolved particle image velocimetry with a pulse-burst laser was used to measure the gas-phase velocity upstream and downstream of a shock wave–particle curtain interaction at three shock Mach numbers (1.22, 1.40, and 1.45) at a repetition rate of 37.5 kHz. The particle curtain was formed from free-falling soda-lime particles resulting in volume fractions of 9% or 23% at mid-height, depending on particle diameter (106–125 and 300–355 μm, respectively). Following impingement by a shock wave, a pressure difference was created between the upstream and downstream sides of the curtain, which accelerated flow through the curtain. Jetting of flow through the curtain was observed downstream once deformation of the curtain began, demonstrating a long-term unsteady effect. Using a control volume approach, the unsteady drag on the curtain was estimated from velocity and pressure data. The drag imposed on the curtain has a strong volume fraction dependence with a prolonged unsteadiness following initial shock impingement. Additionally, the data suggest that the resulting pressure difference following the propagation of the reflected and transmitted shock waves is the primary component to curtain drag.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-9476J
Journal ID: ISSN 2469-990X; 647669
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Fluids
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2469-990X
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS
OSTI Identifier:
1369445
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1372579

DeMauro, Edward Paisley, Wagner, Justin L., Beresh, Steven J., and Farias, Paul Abraham. Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301.
DeMauro, Edward Paisley, Wagner, Justin L., Beresh, Steven J., & Farias, Paul Abraham. Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301.
DeMauro, Edward Paisley, Wagner, Justin L., Beresh, Steven J., and Farias, Paul Abraham. 2017. "Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1369445.
@article{osti_1369445,
title = {Unsteady drag following shock wave impingement on a dense particle curtain measured using pulse-burst PIV},
author = {DeMauro, Edward Paisley and Wagner, Justin L. and Beresh, Steven J. and Farias, Paul Abraham},
abstractNote = {High-speed, time-resolved particle image velocimetry with a pulse-burst laser was used to measure the gas-phase velocity upstream and downstream of a shock wave–particle curtain interaction at three shock Mach numbers (1.22, 1.40, and 1.45) at a repetition rate of 37.5 kHz. The particle curtain was formed from free-falling soda-lime particles resulting in volume fractions of 9% or 23% at mid-height, depending on particle diameter (106–125 and 300–355 μm, respectively). Following impingement by a shock wave, a pressure difference was created between the upstream and downstream sides of the curtain, which accelerated flow through the curtain. Jetting of flow through the curtain was observed downstream once deformation of the curtain began, demonstrating a long-term unsteady effect. Using a control volume approach, the unsteady drag on the curtain was estimated from velocity and pressure data. The drag imposed on the curtain has a strong volume fraction dependence with a prolonged unsteadiness following initial shock impingement. Additionally, the data suggest that the resulting pressure difference following the propagation of the reflected and transmitted shock waves is the primary component to curtain drag.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.064301},
journal = {Physical Review Fluids},
number = 6,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {6}
}