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Title: Investigation of Dalton and Amagat’s laws for gas mixtures with shock propagation

Dalton's and Amagat's laws (also known as the law of partial pressures and the law of partial volumes respectively) are two well-known thermodynamic models describing gas mixtures. We focus our current research on determining the suitability of these models in predicting effects of shock propagation through gas mixtures. Experiments are conducted at the Shock Tube Facility at the University of New Mexico (UNM). The gas mixture used in these experiments consists of approximately 50% sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and 50% helium (He) by mass. Fast response pressure transducers are used to obtain pressure readings both before and after the shock wave; these data are then used to determine the velocity of the shock wave. Temperature readings are obtained using an ultra-fast mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) infrared (IR) detector, with a response time on the order of nanoseconds. Coupled with a stabilized broadband infrared light source (operating at 1500 K), the detector provides pre- and post-shock line-of-sight readings of average temperature within the shock tube, which are used to determine the speed of sound in the gas mixture. Paired with the velocity of the shock wave, this information allows us to determine the Mach number. Our experimental results are compared with theoreticalmore » predictions of Dalton's and Amagat's laws to determine which one is more suitable.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [4]
  1. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  2. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
  3. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering
  4. Indian Inst. of Technology (IIT), Kanpur (India). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0002913
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Computational Methods and Experimental Measurements
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 1; Conference: 9.International Conference on Computational and Experimental Methods in Multiphase and Complex Flow, Tallinn (Estonia), 20-22 Jun 2017; Journal ID: ISSN 2046-0546
Research Org:
Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Dalton’s law; Amagat’s law; shock waves; compressibility; gas mixture
OSTI Identifier:
1368389

Wayne, Patrick, Cooper, Sean, Simons, Dylan, Trueba Monje, Ignacio, Yoo, Jae Hwun, Vorobieff, Peter, Truman, C. Randall, and Kumar, Sanjay. Investigation of Dalton and Amagat’s laws for gas mixtures with shock propagation. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.2495/CMEM-V6-N1-1-10.
Wayne, Patrick, Cooper, Sean, Simons, Dylan, Trueba Monje, Ignacio, Yoo, Jae Hwun, Vorobieff, Peter, Truman, C. Randall, & Kumar, Sanjay. Investigation of Dalton and Amagat’s laws for gas mixtures with shock propagation. United States. doi:10.2495/CMEM-V6-N1-1-10.
Wayne, Patrick, Cooper, Sean, Simons, Dylan, Trueba Monje, Ignacio, Yoo, Jae Hwun, Vorobieff, Peter, Truman, C. Randall, and Kumar, Sanjay. 2017. "Investigation of Dalton and Amagat’s laws for gas mixtures with shock propagation". United States. doi:10.2495/CMEM-V6-N1-1-10. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1368389.
@article{osti_1368389,
title = {Investigation of Dalton and Amagat’s laws for gas mixtures with shock propagation},
author = {Wayne, Patrick and Cooper, Sean and Simons, Dylan and Trueba Monje, Ignacio and Yoo, Jae Hwun and Vorobieff, Peter and Truman, C. Randall and Kumar, Sanjay},
abstractNote = {Dalton's and Amagat's laws (also known as the law of partial pressures and the law of partial volumes respectively) are two well-known thermodynamic models describing gas mixtures. We focus our current research on determining the suitability of these models in predicting effects of shock propagation through gas mixtures. Experiments are conducted at the Shock Tube Facility at the University of New Mexico (UNM). The gas mixture used in these experiments consists of approximately 50% sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and 50% helium (He) by mass. Fast response pressure transducers are used to obtain pressure readings both before and after the shock wave; these data are then used to determine the velocity of the shock wave. Temperature readings are obtained using an ultra-fast mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) infrared (IR) detector, with a response time on the order of nanoseconds. Coupled with a stabilized broadband infrared light source (operating at 1500 K), the detector provides pre- and post-shock line-of-sight readings of average temperature within the shock tube, which are used to determine the speed of sound in the gas mixture. Paired with the velocity of the shock wave, this information allows us to determine the Mach number. Our experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions of Dalton's and Amagat's laws to determine which one is more suitable.},
doi = {10.2495/CMEM-V6-N1-1-10},
journal = {International Journal of Computational Methods and Experimental Measurements},
number = 1,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {6}
}