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Title: Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura)

Abstract

Knowledge of black vulture (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) spatial ecology is surprisingly limited despite their vital ecological roles. Fine-scale assessments of space use patterns and resource selection are particularly lacking, although development of tracking technologies has allowed data collection at finer temporal and spatial resolution. The objectives of this study were to conduct the first assessment of monthly home range and core area sizes of resident black and turkey vultures with consideration to sex, as well as elucidate differences in monthly, seasonal, and annual activity patterns based on fine-scale movement data analyses. We collected 2.8-million locations for 9 black and 9 turkey vultures from June 2013 –August 2015 using solar-powered GSM/GPS transmitters. We quantified home ranges and core areas using the dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and evaluated differences as a function of species, sex, and month. Mean monthly home ranges for turkey vultures were ~50% larger than those of black vultures, although mean core area sizes did not differ between species. Turkey vulture home ranges varied little across months, with exception to a notable reduction in space-use in May, which corresponds with timing of chick-rearing activities. Black vulture home ranges and core areas as well asmore » turkey vulture core areas were larger in breeding season months (January–April). Comparison of space use between male and female vultures was only possible for black vultures, and space use was only slightly larger for females during breeding months (February–May). Analysis of activity patterns revealed turkey vultures spend more time in flight and switch motion states (between flight and stationary) more frequently than black vultures across temporal scales. Our study reveals substantive variability in space use and activity rates between sympatric black and turkey vultures, providing insights into potential behavioral mechanisms contributing to niche differentiation between these species.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1367937
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1393180
Grant/Contract Number:  
FC09-07SR22506; 13-7439-0959-CA
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: PLoS ONE Journal Volume: 12 Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Holland, Amanda E., Byrne, Michael E., Bryan, A. Lawrence, DeVault, Travis L., Rhodes, Olin E., Beasley, James C., and Margalida, ed., Antoni. Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0179819.
Holland, Amanda E., Byrne, Michael E., Bryan, A. Lawrence, DeVault, Travis L., Rhodes, Olin E., Beasley, James C., & Margalida, ed., Antoni. Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura). United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0179819.
Holland, Amanda E., Byrne, Michael E., Bryan, A. Lawrence, DeVault, Travis L., Rhodes, Olin E., Beasley, James C., and Margalida, ed., Antoni. Wed . "Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura)". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0179819.
@article{osti_1367937,
title = {Fine-scale assessment of home ranges and activity patterns for resident black vultures (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura)},
author = {Holland, Amanda E. and Byrne, Michael E. and Bryan, A. Lawrence and DeVault, Travis L. and Rhodes, Olin E. and Beasley, James C. and Margalida, ed., Antoni},
abstractNote = {Knowledge of black vulture (Coragyps atratus) and turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) spatial ecology is surprisingly limited despite their vital ecological roles. Fine-scale assessments of space use patterns and resource selection are particularly lacking, although development of tracking technologies has allowed data collection at finer temporal and spatial resolution. The objectives of this study were to conduct the first assessment of monthly home range and core area sizes of resident black and turkey vultures with consideration to sex, as well as elucidate differences in monthly, seasonal, and annual activity patterns based on fine-scale movement data analyses. We collected 2.8-million locations for 9 black and 9 turkey vultures from June 2013 –August 2015 using solar-powered GSM/GPS transmitters. We quantified home ranges and core areas using the dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and evaluated differences as a function of species, sex, and month. Mean monthly home ranges for turkey vultures were ~50% larger than those of black vultures, although mean core area sizes did not differ between species. Turkey vulture home ranges varied little across months, with exception to a notable reduction in space-use in May, which corresponds with timing of chick-rearing activities. Black vulture home ranges and core areas as well as turkey vulture core areas were larger in breeding season months (January–April). Comparison of space use between male and female vultures was only possible for black vultures, and space use was only slightly larger for females during breeding months (February–May). Analysis of activity patterns revealed turkey vultures spend more time in flight and switch motion states (between flight and stationary) more frequently than black vultures across temporal scales. Our study reveals substantive variability in space use and activity rates between sympatric black and turkey vultures, providing insights into potential behavioral mechanisms contributing to niche differentiation between these species.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0179819},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 7,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {7}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0179819

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 6 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

Fig 1. Fig 1.: Mean (± SE) monthly (A) 95% home range and (B) 50% core area sizes (km2) for 9 black vultures (BLVU; total locations = 804,470; mean locations/month = 8,429; range = 895–14,391) and 9 turkey vultures (TUVU; total locations = 1,372,194; mean locations/month = 9,026; range = 531–16,566) calculatedmore » from GPS locations collected September 1, 2013 –August 31, 2015. Shaded region highlights months within the breeding season.« less

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      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.