skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Advanced geophysical underground coal gasification monitoring

Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) produces less surface impact, atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse gas than traditional surface mining and combustion. Therefore, it may be useful in mitigating global change caused by anthropogenic activities. Careful monitoring of the UCG process is essential in minimizing environmental impact. Here we first summarize monitoring methods that have been used in previous UCG field trials. We then discuss in more detail a number of promising advanced geophysical techniques. These methods – seismic, electromagnetic, and remote sensing techniques – may provide improved and cost-effective ways to image both the subsurface cavity growth and surface subsidence effects. Active and passive seismic data have the promise to monitor the burn front, cavity growth, and observe cavity collapse events. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produces near real time tomographic images autonomously, monitors the burn front and images the cavity using low-cost sensors, typically running within boreholes. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that has the capability to monitor surface subsidence over the wide area of a commercial-scale UCG operation at a low cost. It may be possible to infer cavity geometry from InSAR (or other surface topography) data using geomechanical modeling. The expected signals from these monitoringmore » methods are described along with interpretive modeling for typical UCG cavities. They are illustrated using field results from UCG trials and other relevant subsurface operations.« less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-641052
Journal ID: ISSN 1381-2386
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1381-2386
Publisher:
Springer
Research Org:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 58 GEOSCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1366915

Mellors, Robert, Yang, X., White, J. A., Ramirez, A., Wagoner, J., and Camp, D. W.. Advanced geophysical underground coal gasification monitoring. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1007/s11027-014-9584-1.
Mellors, Robert, Yang, X., White, J. A., Ramirez, A., Wagoner, J., & Camp, D. W.. Advanced geophysical underground coal gasification monitoring. United States. doi:10.1007/s11027-014-9584-1.
Mellors, Robert, Yang, X., White, J. A., Ramirez, A., Wagoner, J., and Camp, D. W.. 2014. "Advanced geophysical underground coal gasification monitoring". United States. doi:10.1007/s11027-014-9584-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1366915.
@article{osti_1366915,
title = {Advanced geophysical underground coal gasification monitoring},
author = {Mellors, Robert and Yang, X. and White, J. A. and Ramirez, A. and Wagoner, J. and Camp, D. W.},
abstractNote = {Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) produces less surface impact, atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse gas than traditional surface mining and combustion. Therefore, it may be useful in mitigating global change caused by anthropogenic activities. Careful monitoring of the UCG process is essential in minimizing environmental impact. Here we first summarize monitoring methods that have been used in previous UCG field trials. We then discuss in more detail a number of promising advanced geophysical techniques. These methods – seismic, electromagnetic, and remote sensing techniques – may provide improved and cost-effective ways to image both the subsurface cavity growth and surface subsidence effects. Active and passive seismic data have the promise to monitor the burn front, cavity growth, and observe cavity collapse events. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produces near real time tomographic images autonomously, monitors the burn front and images the cavity using low-cost sensors, typically running within boreholes. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that has the capability to monitor surface subsidence over the wide area of a commercial-scale UCG operation at a low cost. It may be possible to infer cavity geometry from InSAR (or other surface topography) data using geomechanical modeling. The expected signals from these monitoring methods are described along with interpretive modeling for typical UCG cavities. They are illustrated using field results from UCG trials and other relevant subsurface operations.},
doi = {10.1007/s11027-014-9584-1},
journal = {Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change},
number = 4,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {7}
}