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This content will become publicly available on June 5, 2018

Title: Interface-induced phenomena in magnetism

Our article reviews static and dynamic interfacial effects in magnetism, focusing on interfacially-driven magnetic effects and phenomena associated with spin-orbit coupling and intrinsic symmetry breaking at interfaces. It provides a historical background and literature survey, but focuses on recent progress, identifying the most exciting new scientific results and pointing to promising future research directions. It starts with an introduction and overview of how basic magnetic properties are affected by interfaces, then turns to a discussion of charge and spin transport through and near interfaces and how these can be used to control the properties of the magnetic layer. Important concepts include spin accumulation, spin currents, spin transfer torque, and spin pumping. We provide an overview for the current state of knowledge and existing review literature on interfacial effects such as exchange bias, exchange spring magnets, spin Hall effect, oxide heterostructures, and topological insulators. Our article highlights recent discoveries of interface-induced magnetism and non-collinear spin textures, non-linear dynamics including spin torque transfer and magnetization reversal induced by interfaces, and interfacial effects in ultrafast magnetization processes.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [5] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8] ;  [9] ;  [10] ;  [11] ;  [12] ;  [13] ;  [14] ;  [15] ;  [16] ;  [17] ;  [18] ;  [19] ;  [20] more »;  [21] ;  [22] ;  [23] ;  [24] ;  [25] ;  [26] ;  [27] « less
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Division
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Materials Science Division
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  4. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  5. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Center for Memory and Recording Research
  6. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science
  7. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics
  8. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Physics Dept. and Kavli Inst.
  9. Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics
  10. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Inst. for Materials and Energy Sciences
  11. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Division; Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Physics Dept.
  12. Univ. of Paris-Sud, Palaiseau (France). CNRS / Thales Joint Physics Unit
  13. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, and Dept. of Physics
  14. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (ASCR), Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Physics; Univ. of Nottingham (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy
  15. Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands). Inst. for Molecules and Materials
  16. Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). COBRA Research Inst.
  17. Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  18. Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science adn Engineering
  19. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Enginering
  20. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  21. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  22. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Center for Advanced Nanoscience, Materials Science and Engineering Program
  23. Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics
  24. National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology
  25. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  26. Univ. of Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)
  27. Univ. of Denver, CO (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; FG02-87ER45332; FG02-06ER46275; SC0012670; FG02-08ER46544; SC0012371; AC02-76SF00515; SC0003678; DMR-1507048; DMR-1420013; DMR-1410247; DMR-1420451; DMR-1406333; 268066; 682955; ANR-14-CE26-0012; LM2011026; 14-37427; AC02-06CH11357
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Reviews of Modern Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6861
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF); European Research Council (ERC); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Magnetism; Interfaces; Spin Orbit Coupling; Spin Currents; Spin Torques; Spin Textures
OSTI Identifier:
1365567
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1361450; OSTI ID: 1369407; OSTI ID: 1373398