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Title: Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti

Bacteria have developed various stress response pathways to improve their assimilation and allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate. While both the nitrogen stress response (NSR) and phosphate stress response (PSR) have been studied individually, there are few experiments reported that characterize effects of multiple stresses on one or more pathways in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultatively symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, regulate the NSR activity, but analysis of global transcription changes in a PII deficient mutant suggest that the S. meliloti PII proteins may also regulate the PSR. PII double deletion mutants grow very slowly and pseudoreversion of the slow growth phenotype is common. In order to understand this phenomenon better, transposon mutants were isolated that had a faster growing phenotype. One mutation was in phoB, the response regulator for a two component regulatory system that is important in the PSR. phoB::Tn5 mutants had different phenotypes in the wild type compared to a PII deficient background. This led to the hypothesis that phosphate stress affects the NSR and conversely, that nitrogen stress affects the PSR. These results show that phosphate availability affects glutamine synthetase activity and expression, which are often used as indicators ofmore » NSR activity, but that nitrogen availability did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity and expression, which are indicators of PSR activity. Finally, we conclude that the NSR is co-regulated by nitrogen and phosphate, whereas the PSR does not appear to be co-regulated by nitrogen in addition to its known phosphate regulation.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1]
  1. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). School of Moleclar Biosciences and Inst. of Biological Chemistry
  2. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FG03-96ER20225
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Research Org:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; nitrogen stress; phosphate stress; glutamine synthetase; alkaline phosphatase; PII nitrogen regulatory proteins; Phob
OSTI Identifier:
1361511

Hagberg, Kelly L., Yurgel, Svetlana N., Mulder, Monika, and Kahn, Michael L.. Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.01928.
Hagberg, Kelly L., Yurgel, Svetlana N., Mulder, Monika, & Kahn, Michael L.. Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.01928.
Hagberg, Kelly L., Yurgel, Svetlana N., Mulder, Monika, and Kahn, Michael L.. 2016. "Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2016.01928. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361511.
@article{osti_1361511,
title = {Interaction between Nitrogen and Phosphate Stress Responses in Sinorhizobium meliloti},
author = {Hagberg, Kelly L. and Yurgel, Svetlana N. and Mulder, Monika and Kahn, Michael L.},
abstractNote = {Bacteria have developed various stress response pathways to improve their assimilation and allocation of limited nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphate. While both the nitrogen stress response (NSR) and phosphate stress response (PSR) have been studied individually, there are few experiments reported that characterize effects of multiple stresses on one or more pathways in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultatively symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria. The PII proteins, GlnB and GlnK, regulate the NSR activity, but analysis of global transcription changes in a PII deficient mutant suggest that the S. meliloti PII proteins may also regulate the PSR. PII double deletion mutants grow very slowly and pseudoreversion of the slow growth phenotype is common. In order to understand this phenomenon better, transposon mutants were isolated that had a faster growing phenotype. One mutation was in phoB, the response regulator for a two component regulatory system that is important in the PSR. phoB::Tn5 mutants had different phenotypes in the wild type compared to a PII deficient background. This led to the hypothesis that phosphate stress affects the NSR and conversely, that nitrogen stress affects the PSR. These results show that phosphate availability affects glutamine synthetase activity and expression, which are often used as indicators of NSR activity, but that nitrogen availability did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity and expression, which are indicators of PSR activity. Finally, we conclude that the NSR is co-regulated by nitrogen and phosphate, whereas the PSR does not appear to be co-regulated by nitrogen in addition to its known phosphate regulation.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2016.01928},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {11}
}