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Title: Plasma source development for fusion-relevant material testing

Plasma facing materials in the divertor of a magnetic fusion reactor will have to tolerate steady-state plasma heat fluxes in the range of 10 MW/m2 for ~107 sec, in addition to fusion neutron fluences, which can damage the plasma facing materials to high displacements per atom (dpa) of ~50 dpa . Material solutions needed for the plasma facing components are yet to be developed and tested. The Materials Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a newly proposed steady state linear plasma device that is designed to deliver the necessary plasma heat flux to a target for this material testing, including the capability to expose a-priori neutron damaged material samples to those plasmas. The requirements of the plasma source needed to deliver this plasma heat flux are being developed on the Proto-MPEX device, which is a linear high-intensity radio frequency (RF) plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is operated at 13.56 MHz with RF power levels up to 120 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~30 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-densemore » helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), and ion cyclotron heating at 7-9 MHz (~30 kW) is via a magnetic beach approach. High plasma densities >6x1019/m3 have been produced in deuterium, with electron temperatures that can range from 2 to >10 eV. Operation with on-axis magnetic field strengths between 0.6 and 1.4 T is typical. The plasma heat flux delivered to a target can be > 10 MW/m2, depending on the operating conditions.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces and Films
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 35; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0734-2101
Publisher:
American Vacuum Society
Research Org:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY
OSTI Identifier:
1361355

Caughman, John B. O., Goulding, Richard H., Biewer, Theodore M., Bigelow, Timothy S., Campbell, Ian H., Caneses, Juan, Diem, Stephanie J., Fadnek, Andy, Fehling, Dan T., Isler, Ralph C., Martin, Elijah H., Parish, Chad M., Rapp, Juergen, Wang, Kun, Beers, Clyde J., Donovan, David, Kafle, Nischal, Ray, Holly B., Shaw, Guinevere C., and Showers, Melissa A.. Plasma source development for fusion-relevant material testing. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1116/1.4982664.
Caughman, John B. O., Goulding, Richard H., Biewer, Theodore M., Bigelow, Timothy S., Campbell, Ian H., Caneses, Juan, Diem, Stephanie J., Fadnek, Andy, Fehling, Dan T., Isler, Ralph C., Martin, Elijah H., Parish, Chad M., Rapp, Juergen, Wang, Kun, Beers, Clyde J., Donovan, David, Kafle, Nischal, Ray, Holly B., Shaw, Guinevere C., & Showers, Melissa A.. Plasma source development for fusion-relevant material testing. United States. doi:10.1116/1.4982664.
Caughman, John B. O., Goulding, Richard H., Biewer, Theodore M., Bigelow, Timothy S., Campbell, Ian H., Caneses, Juan, Diem, Stephanie J., Fadnek, Andy, Fehling, Dan T., Isler, Ralph C., Martin, Elijah H., Parish, Chad M., Rapp, Juergen, Wang, Kun, Beers, Clyde J., Donovan, David, Kafle, Nischal, Ray, Holly B., Shaw, Guinevere C., and Showers, Melissa A.. 2017. "Plasma source development for fusion-relevant material testing". United States. doi:10.1116/1.4982664. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1361355.
@article{osti_1361355,
title = {Plasma source development for fusion-relevant material testing},
author = {Caughman, John B. O. and Goulding, Richard H. and Biewer, Theodore M. and Bigelow, Timothy S. and Campbell, Ian H. and Caneses, Juan and Diem, Stephanie J. and Fadnek, Andy and Fehling, Dan T. and Isler, Ralph C. and Martin, Elijah H. and Parish, Chad M. and Rapp, Juergen and Wang, Kun and Beers, Clyde J. and Donovan, David and Kafle, Nischal and Ray, Holly B. and Shaw, Guinevere C. and Showers, Melissa A.},
abstractNote = {Plasma facing materials in the divertor of a magnetic fusion reactor will have to tolerate steady-state plasma heat fluxes in the range of 10 MW/m2 for ~107 sec, in addition to fusion neutron fluences, which can damage the plasma facing materials to high displacements per atom (dpa) of ~50 dpa . Material solutions needed for the plasma facing components are yet to be developed and tested. The Materials Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a newly proposed steady state linear plasma device that is designed to deliver the necessary plasma heat flux to a target for this material testing, including the capability to expose a-priori neutron damaged material samples to those plasmas. The requirements of the plasma source needed to deliver this plasma heat flux are being developed on the Proto-MPEX device, which is a linear high-intensity radio frequency (RF) plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is operated at 13.56 MHz with RF power levels up to 120 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~30 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), and ion cyclotron heating at 7-9 MHz (~30 kW) is via a magnetic beach approach. High plasma densities >6x1019/m3 have been produced in deuterium, with electron temperatures that can range from 2 to >10 eV. Operation with on-axis magnetic field strengths between 0.6 and 1.4 T is typical. The plasma heat flux delivered to a target can be > 10 MW/m2, depending on the operating conditions.},
doi = {10.1116/1.4982664},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, Vacuum, Surfaces and Films},
number = 3,
volume = 35,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {5}
}