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Title: Cosmic shear as a probe of galaxy formation physics

Here, we evaluate the potential for current and future cosmic shear measurements from large galaxy surveys to constrain the impact of baryonic physics on the matter power spectrum. We do so using a model-independent parametrization that describes deviations of the matter power spectrum from the dark-matter-only case as a set of principal components that are localized in wavenumber and redshift. We perform forecasts for a variety of current and future data sets, and find that at least ~90 per cent of the constraining power of these data sets is contained in no more than nine principal components. The constraining power of different surveys can be quantified using a figure of merit defined relative to currently available surveys. With this metric, we find that the final Dark Energy Survey data set (DES Y5) and the Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey will be roughly an order of magnitude more powerful than existing data in constraining baryonic effects. Upcoming Stage IV surveys (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) will improve upon this by a further factor of a few. We show that this conclusion is robust to marginalization over several key systematics. The ultimate power of cosmic shear to constrainmore » galaxy formation is dependent on understanding systematics in the shear measurements at small (sub-arcminute) scales. Lastly, if these systematics can be sufficiently controlled, cosmic shear measurements from DES Y5 and other future surveys have the potential to provide a very clean probe of galaxy formation and to strongly constrain a wide range of predictions from modern hydrodynamical simulations.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  2. Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  3. Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 463; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0035-8711
Publisher:
Royal Astronomical Society
Research Org:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab. (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; gravitational lensing: weak; galaxies: formation; cosmology: observations
OSTI Identifier:
1360803

Foreman, Simon, Becker, Matthew R., and Wechsler, Risa H.. Cosmic shear as a probe of galaxy formation physics. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2189.
Foreman, Simon, Becker, Matthew R., & Wechsler, Risa H.. Cosmic shear as a probe of galaxy formation physics. United States. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2189.
Foreman, Simon, Becker, Matthew R., and Wechsler, Risa H.. 2016. "Cosmic shear as a probe of galaxy formation physics". United States. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2189. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360803.
@article{osti_1360803,
title = {Cosmic shear as a probe of galaxy formation physics},
author = {Foreman, Simon and Becker, Matthew R. and Wechsler, Risa H.},
abstractNote = {Here, we evaluate the potential for current and future cosmic shear measurements from large galaxy surveys to constrain the impact of baryonic physics on the matter power spectrum. We do so using a model-independent parametrization that describes deviations of the matter power spectrum from the dark-matter-only case as a set of principal components that are localized in wavenumber and redshift. We perform forecasts for a variety of current and future data sets, and find that at least ~90 per cent of the constraining power of these data sets is contained in no more than nine principal components. The constraining power of different surveys can be quantified using a figure of merit defined relative to currently available surveys. With this metric, we find that the final Dark Energy Survey data set (DES Y5) and the Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey will be roughly an order of magnitude more powerful than existing data in constraining baryonic effects. Upcoming Stage IV surveys (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope) will improve upon this by a further factor of a few. We show that this conclusion is robust to marginalization over several key systematics. The ultimate power of cosmic shear to constrain galaxy formation is dependent on understanding systematics in the shear measurements at small (sub-arcminute) scales. Lastly, if these systematics can be sufficiently controlled, cosmic shear measurements from DES Y5 and other future surveys have the potential to provide a very clean probe of galaxy formation and to strongly constrain a wide range of predictions from modern hydrodynamical simulations.},
doi = {10.1093/mnras/stw2189},
journal = {Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
number = 3,
volume = 463,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {9}
}