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Title: In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au

High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. We show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. Our study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ;  [2] ;  [5] ;  [6]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  2. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Materials
  3. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  4. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). MPA-CINT
  5. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Materials; Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  6. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Materials; Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-29506
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; SC0016337
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; nanoscale materials
OSTI Identifier:
1360711

Li, Jin, Fan, Cuncai, Ding, Jie, Xue, Sichuang, Chen, Youxing, Li, Qiang, Wang, Haiyan, and Zhang, Xinghang. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/srep39484.
Li, Jin, Fan, Cuncai, Ding, Jie, Xue, Sichuang, Chen, Youxing, Li, Qiang, Wang, Haiyan, & Zhang, Xinghang. In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au. United States. doi:10.1038/srep39484.
Li, Jin, Fan, Cuncai, Ding, Jie, Xue, Sichuang, Chen, Youxing, Li, Qiang, Wang, Haiyan, and Zhang, Xinghang. 2017. "In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au". United States. doi:10.1038/srep39484. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1360711.
@article{osti_1360711,
title = {In situ heavy ion irradiation studies of nanopore shrinkage and enhanced radiation tolerance of nanoporous Au},
author = {Li, Jin and Fan, Cuncai and Ding, Jie and Xue, Sichuang and Chen, Youxing and Li, Qiang and Wang, Haiyan and Zhang, Xinghang},
abstractNote = {High energy particle radiations induce severe microstructural damage in metallic materials. Nanoporous materials with a giant surface-to-volume ratio may alleviate radiation damage in irradiated metallic materials as free surface are defect sinks. We show, by using in situ Kr ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope at room temperature, that nanoporous Au indeed has significantly improved radiation tolerance comparing with coarse-grained, fully dense Au. In situ studies show that nanopores can absorb and eliminate a large number of radiation-induced defect clusters. Meanwhile, nanopores shrink (self-heal) during radiation, and their shrinkage rate is pore size dependent. Furthermore, the in situ studies show dose-rate-dependent diffusivity of defect clusters. Our study sheds light on the design of radiation-tolerant nanoporous metallic materials for advanced nuclear reactor applications.},
doi = {10.1038/srep39484},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {1}
}