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Title: Rhizosphere engineering: Enhancing sustainable plant ecosystem productivity

Here, the rhizosphere is arguably the most complex microbial habitat on earth, comprising an integrated network of plant roots, soil and a diverse microbial consortium of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microeukaryotes. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure and function of the rhizosphere will allow us to harness plant-microbe interactions and other rhizosphere activities as a means to increase or restore plant ecosystem productivity, improve plant responses to a wide range of environmental perturbations, and mitigate effects of climate change by designing ecosystems for long-term soil carbon storage. Here, we review critical knowledge gaps in rhizosphere science, and how mechanistic understanding of rhizosphere interactions can be leveraged in rhizosphere engineering efforts with the goal of maintaining sustainable plant ecosystem services for food and bioenergy production in an ever changing global climate.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-124740
Journal ID: ISSN 2452-2198; PII: S2452219817300459
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830; 204412
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Rhizosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: P2; Journal ID: ISSN 2452-2198
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; abiotic stress; plant-microbe interactions; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR); rhizosphere; rhizosphere engineering
OSTI Identifier:
1357833
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1364400; OSTI ID: 1365445

Ahkami, Amir H., White, III, Richard Allen, Handakumbura, Pubudu P., and Jansson, Christer. Rhizosphere engineering: Enhancing sustainable plant ecosystem productivity. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.012.
Ahkami, Amir H., White, III, Richard Allen, Handakumbura, Pubudu P., & Jansson, Christer. Rhizosphere engineering: Enhancing sustainable plant ecosystem productivity. United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.012.
Ahkami, Amir H., White, III, Richard Allen, Handakumbura, Pubudu P., and Jansson, Christer. 2017. "Rhizosphere engineering: Enhancing sustainable plant ecosystem productivity". United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.012.
@article{osti_1357833,
title = {Rhizosphere engineering: Enhancing sustainable plant ecosystem productivity},
author = {Ahkami, Amir H. and White, III, Richard Allen and Handakumbura, Pubudu P. and Jansson, Christer},
abstractNote = {Here, the rhizosphere is arguably the most complex microbial habitat on earth, comprising an integrated network of plant roots, soil and a diverse microbial consortium of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microeukaryotes. Understanding, predicting and controlling the structure and function of the rhizosphere will allow us to harness plant-microbe interactions and other rhizosphere activities as a means to increase or restore plant ecosystem productivity, improve plant responses to a wide range of environmental perturbations, and mitigate effects of climate change by designing ecosystems for long-term soil carbon storage. Here, we review critical knowledge gaps in rhizosphere science, and how mechanistic understanding of rhizosphere interactions can be leveraged in rhizosphere engineering efforts with the goal of maintaining sustainable plant ecosystem services for food and bioenergy production in an ever changing global climate.},
doi = {10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.04.012},
journal = {Rhizosphere},
number = P2,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {4}
}