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Title: Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels

In the alloyed and compound contacts between metal and semiconductor transistor channels we see that they enable self-aligned gate processes which play a significant role in transistor scaling. At nanoscale dimensions and for nanowire channels, prior experiments focused on reactions along the channel length, but the early stage of reaction in their cross sections remains unknown. We report on the dynamics of the solid-state reaction between metal (Ni) and semiconductor (In 0.53Ga 0.47As), along the cross-section of nanowires that are 15 nm in width. Unlike planar structures where crystalline nickelide readily forms at conventional, low alloying temperatures, nanowires exhibit a solid-state amorphization step that can undergo a crystal regrowth step at elevated temperatures. Here, we capture the layer-by-layer reaction mechanism and growth rate anisotropy using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our kinetic model depicts this new, in-plane contact formation which could pave the way for engineered nanoscale transistors.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies
  3. Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program and Dept. of NanoEngineering
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-2000J; SAND-2016-9942J
Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984; 651278
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; AC52-06NA25396
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; amorphization; In situ TEM; InGaAs; nanowire; nickelide; recrystallization
OSTI Identifier:
1357020
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1361650

Chen, Renjie, Jungjohann, Katherine L., Mook, William M., Nogan, John, and Dayeh, Shadi A.. Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04713.
Chen, Renjie, Jungjohann, Katherine L., Mook, William M., Nogan, John, & Dayeh, Shadi A.. Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04713.
Chen, Renjie, Jungjohann, Katherine L., Mook, William M., Nogan, John, and Dayeh, Shadi A.. 2017. "Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04713. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1357020.
@article{osti_1357020,
title = {Atomic Scale Dynamics of Contact Formation in the Cross-Section of InGaAs Nanowire Channels},
author = {Chen, Renjie and Jungjohann, Katherine L. and Mook, William M. and Nogan, John and Dayeh, Shadi A.},
abstractNote = {In the alloyed and compound contacts between metal and semiconductor transistor channels we see that they enable self-aligned gate processes which play a significant role in transistor scaling. At nanoscale dimensions and for nanowire channels, prior experiments focused on reactions along the channel length, but the early stage of reaction in their cross sections remains unknown. We report on the dynamics of the solid-state reaction between metal (Ni) and semiconductor (In0.53Ga0.47As), along the cross-section of nanowires that are 15 nm in width. Unlike planar structures where crystalline nickelide readily forms at conventional, low alloying temperatures, nanowires exhibit a solid-state amorphization step that can undergo a crystal regrowth step at elevated temperatures. Here, we capture the layer-by-layer reaction mechanism and growth rate anisotropy using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our kinetic model depicts this new, in-plane contact formation which could pave the way for engineered nanoscale transistors.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04713},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 4,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {3}
}